Neglected Gandhi Hall to be restored soon | india | Hindustan Times
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Neglected Gandhi Hall to be restored soon

india Updated: Jun 13, 2013 15:48 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

The historic and long neglected The historic and long eglected Gandhi Hall could soon be restored to its former pristine glory, albeit with a few enticing add-ons like children-friendly gardens, an amphitheatre and, on a more prosaic note and space for commercial activities permissible on a strictly temporary basis.

Mayor Krishna Murari Moghe on Tuesday asked consultants for the restoration project to submit a formal proposal within two to three days so that tenders could be floated.

Himanshu Dudwadkar, who along with partner and fellow architect Shreya Bhargava, will oversee the project said the restoration would be carried out in a phased manner.

“The first phase will involve the restoration of the building and immediate surroundings,” Dudwadkar told Hindustan Times.

The redevelopment of gardens will come next while a makeover of the entire campus will be the last item on the list. The latter promises to be a difficult task since a multitude of agencies, Archaeology, Nazul etc, would be involved.

“Work will begin in around a month, once the bid is finalised,” said Dudwadkar.

So what is the architect duo aiming for? Dudwadkar said the focus would be on developing Gandhi Hall as a citizen’s centre, which would be first choice for people owing to an eclectic array of facilities available to suit every taste.

“The gardens should be redeveloped to make them more children-friendly,” he asserted with all the sensitivity of a new father (his wife Shreya gave birth to a baby boy on June 3).

He said mayor Moghe also hinted at the possibility of setting up an amphitheatre and space could also be made available for amateur theatre groups or for tribal shows.

“Melas and fairs that have traditionally been held here should, of course, be allowed to continue uninterrupted,” said the architect who said that some real estate could also be earmarked for commercial activities.

He, however, stressed that material exchanges would have to play second fiddle to social and cultural aspects. “There could be temporary commercial activity from kiosks which can be dismantled and put away,” said Dudwadkar who teamed up with Shreya Bhargava for the restoration of the Malhari Martand temple at Rajwada - an achievement that won universal praise.

So when you have the daunting task of restoring a nearly-century building that is a city landmark, where do you begin? “The first priority will be to restore the building to what it used to be,” said the architect.

One good thing is that, despite the vandalism, pilferage and general lack of upkeep, the building is “structurally very sound.”


could soon be restored to its former pristine glory, albeit with a few enticing add-ons like children-friendly gardens, an amphitheatre and, on a more prosaic note and space for commercial activities permissible on a strictly temporary basis.

Mayor Krishna Murari Moghe on Tuesday asked consultants for the restoration project to submit a formal proposal within two to three days so that tenders could be floated.

Himanshu Dudwadkar, who along with partner and fellow architect Shreya Bhargava, will oversee the project said the restoration would be carried out in a phased manner.

“The first phase will involve the restoration of the building and immediate surroundings,” Dudwadkar told Hindustan Times.

The redevelopment of gardens will come next while a makeover of the entire campus will be the last item on the list. The latter promises to be a difficult task since a multitude of agencies, Archaeology, Nazul etc, would be involved.

“Work will begin in around a month, once the bid is finalised,” said Dudwadkar.
So what is the architect duo aiming for? Dudwadkar said the focus would be on developing Gandhi Hall as a citizen’s centre, which would be first choice for people owing to an eclectic array of facilities available to suit every taste.

“The gardens should be redeveloped to make them more children-friendly,” he asserted with all the sensitivity of a new father (his wife Shreya gave birth to a baby boy on June 3).

He said mayor Moghe also hinted at the possibility of setting up an amphitheatre and space could also be made available for amateur theatre groups or for tribal shows.

“Melas and fairs that have traditionally been held here should, of course, be allowed to continue uninterrupted,” said the architect who said that some real estate could also be earmarked for commercial activities.

He, however, stressed that material exchanges would have to play second fiddle to social and cultural aspects. “There could be temporary commercial activity from kiosks which can be dismantled and put away,” said Dudwadkar who teamed up with Shreya Bhargava for the restoration of the Malhari Martand temple at Rajwada - an achievement that won universal praise.

So when you have the daunting task of restoring a nearly-century building that is a city landmark, where do you begin? “The first priority will be to restore the building to what it used to be,” said the architect.

One good thing is that, despite the vandalism, pilferage and general lack of upkeep, the building is “structurally very sound.”


could soon be restored to its former pristine glory, albeit with a few enticing add-ons like children-friendly gardens, an amphitheatre and, on a more prosaic note and space for commercial activities permissible on a strictly temporary basis.

Mayor Krishna Murari Moghe on Tuesday asked consultants for the restoration project to submit a formal proposal within two to three days so that tenders could be floated.

Himanshu Dudwadkar, who along with partner and fellow architect Shreya Bhargava, will oversee the project said the restoration would be carried out in a phased manner.

“The first phase will involve the restoration of the building and immediate surroundings,” Dudwadkar told Hindustan Times.

The redevelopment of gardens will come next while a makeover of the entire campus will be the last item on the list. The latter promises to be a difficult task since a multitude of agencies, Archaeology, Nazul etc, would be involved.

“Work will begin in around a month, once the bid is finalised,” said Dudwadkar.
So what is the architect duo aiming for? Dudwadkar said the focus would be on developing Gandhi Hall as a citizen’s centre, which would be first choice for people owing to an eclectic array of facilities available to suit every taste.

“The gardens should be redeveloped to make them more children-friendly,” he asserted with all the sensitivity of a new father (his wife Shreya gave birth to a baby boy on June 3).

He said mayor Moghe also hinted at the possibility of setting up an amphitheatre and space could also be made available for amateur theatre groups or for tribal shows.

“Melas and fairs that have traditionally been held here should, of course, be allowed to continue uninterrupted,” said the architect who said that some real estate could also be earmarked for commercial activities.

He, however, stressed that material exchanges would have to play second fiddle to social and cultural aspects. “There could be temporary commercial activity from kiosks which can be dismantled and put away,” said Dudwadkar who teamed up with Shreya Bhargava for the restoration of the Malhari Martand temple at Rajwada - an achievement that won universal praise.

So when you have the daunting task of restoring a nearly-century building that is a city landmark, where do you begin? “The first priority will be to restore the building to what it used to be,” said the architect.

One good thing is that, despite the vandalism, pilferage and general lack of upkeep, the building is “structurally very sound.”


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