No lessons learnt, Caribbeans rule | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Apr 24, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

No lessons learnt, Caribbeans rule

india Updated: Mar 05, 2011 01:35 IST
Nilankur Das

Some had bought 400 taka tickets for 11,000 taka (around R 7500) in the black market. But then any interest in the match was over by the 11th over. Bangladesh had lost half their side with just 41 runs on board.

Their innings was wrapped up faster than even a Twenty20 match, for the lowest ever total in the World Cup by a full member. It was clear the batting frailties exposed during their comeback win against Ireland did not serve as a wake up call.

West Indies completed a nine-wicket victory within the first session and then were back in the ground playing football.

NO WAKE-UP CALL
Against Ireland, the batsmen had at least given Bangladesh a start and put some runs on board for the bowlers to make a match of it.

On Friday, some disciplined bowling by the West Indies coupled with a string of bad shots and a lack of footwork meant Bangladesh have been pushed to a spot from where it could be difficult to come back.

TAMIM’S DISMISSAL
West Indies had to use just three bowlers as the innings lasted for less than 19 overs. They gave very little room to the batsmen, who once again came out with an intension of hitting every other delivery to the fence.

Tamim Iqbal’s dismissal generally triggers a collapse of sorts. It happened against Ireland, and once he was caught at second slip flashing the bat against Kemar Roach in the first over, the others caved in with little resistance.

Skipper Darren Sammy got his act together, taking Tamim’s catch in the first over and three quick wickets himself.

TURNING TRACK
The pitch did offer some turn to spinners and the deliveries that got skipper Shakib-Al Hasan and West Indies opener Devon Smith out deviated rather sharply.

Had Bangladesh put their heads down and grafted to anything close to 250, it could have been one of the brighter evenings in their cricket. Instead it turned out to be one of their saddest afternoons in recent times.

A second dismal loss, after an 87-run defeat to India, has brought Bangladesh’s net run-rate crashing like their stock market; they will now hope England lose to South Africa before coming to Chittagong where the cricket caravan now shifts to.

Beating the Netherlands and England in Chittagong now may not be enough and Ireland, on a high after beating England, could just spoil their World Cup party once again like they did in the last edition — this time by beating some another team though.