No more fines for jaywalking, traffic police say that's fine | india | Hindustan Times
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No more fines for jaywalking, traffic police say that's fine

Delhi's jaywalkers have now the licence to violate traffic norms as they would no more be fined for violating traffic norms as the police feels that there is hardly any need to prosecute them as this is not a major problem in the city. Subhendu Ray reports.

india Updated: Mar 24, 2011 23:23 IST
Subhendu Ray

Delhi's jaywalkers have now the licence to violate traffic norms as they would no more be fined for violating traffic norms as the police feels that there is hardly any need to prosecute them as this is not a major problem in the city.

"Instead, we are emphasising on installing pedestrian signals at all important junctions so that pedestrians have a safe and easy crossover," said Satyendra Garg, joint commissioner of police (traffic).

He said that pedestrian signals are being installed at Delhi Gate, Safdarjung, INA, Yusuf Sarai, Green Park, AIIMS and at some other important intersections.

Towards the end of 2007, the traffic department had enforced new rules against the capital's jaywalkers. "This was a revolutionary step that moved beyond fining only motorists for violating rules," said a senior officer of Delhi police. "I do not understand why they stopped this exercise," he added.

The rule persecuting jaywalkers had been made under Section 28 of the Delhi Police Act that empowers the police to make new rules to ensure better governance of traffic.

In the past three years, Delhi police had prosecuted over 30,000 jaywalkers for violating traffic norms.

But according to a senior traffic officer, "The amount of the fine was ridiculously small and defeated the whole purpose of the fine." As per the rule, a jaywalker is fined R20 for a violation and R100 if caught again.

Most of the pedestrians had found the whole idea of fining people for just walking across a busy road bizarre. "But this was a necessary step to make the Capital's roads safe considering that most jaywalkers are just as responsible for road accidents as motorists are. If we remove the fear factor, traffic violations on their part will only increase," said PK Sarkar, an eminent traffic and transport expert and also head, transportation, School of Planning and Architecture.

Pedestrians are involved in at least 40% to 50% of road accidents in Delhi, he said.