No replacement for Raja, Maran: DMK | india | Hindustan Times
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No replacement for Raja, Maran: DMK

The DMK on Sunday showed its displeasure against the Congress by deciding not to choose replacements for party leaders A Raja and Dayanidhi Maran in the union cabinet. KV Lakshmana reports.

india Updated: Jul 25, 2011 01:53 IST
KV Lakshmana

The DMK on Sunday showed its displeasure against the Congress by deciding not to choose replacements for party leaders A Raja and Dayanidhi Maran in the union cabinet.

The two leaders quit their ministerial posts in the wake of the 2G spectrum scam.

Talking to mediapersons at the end of the DMK’s two-day general council meet here, party chief M Karunanidhi said, “Some local Congress leaders are making unsavoury remarks against the DMK and we are very aggrieved.”

But he did not — contrary to the buzz in party corridors — speak about the Congress not helping his daughter and Rajya Sabha member Kanimozhi get bail in a 2G spectrum scam case. But the party did accuse the CBI of “bias” in opposing Kanimozhi’s bail plea.

Karunanidhi said not choosing Raja and Maran’s replacements did not mean the DMK was not supporting the UPA. “We have decided to maintain the status quo (on ties with the Congress). All the other DMK ministers will stay,” he said.

Playing down the succession row between his sons MK Alagiri and MK Stalin, he said the DMK would not change its leaders “just to suit newspaper headlines”.

Earlier in the day, Alagiri, union chemicals and fertilisers minister, walked out of the post-lunch session of the meeting, reportedly irked by party leaders' demanding younger brother Stalin's elevation.

The party tried to end the succession battle by reposing faith in Karunanidhi's leadership through a resolution but rumours refused to die down.

DMK veteran and former MP M Ramanathan, 80, told Karunanidhi, 87, “The party is above all of us. Please touch your conscience and tell us who will lead.” “Thalapathi, Thalapathi (general, general — a term Stalin's supporters use to refer to him),” roared the 1,800-strong gathering comprising party leaders and invitees.

Karunanidhi did not respond to Ramanathan's question. Instead, a two-hour break was called. On Saturday, Karunanidhi had intervened in a war of words between his sons' supporters and asked if he should quit.