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Not a field day anymore

Now many of us may have more fruitful things to do with our time than shoot the breeze with the petunias or parsnips, but not so bonnie Prince Charlie.

india Updated: Jun 28, 2007 01:17 IST

Having a regular natter with your plants helps them grow, or so we have been led to believe. Now many of us may have more fruitful things to do with our time than shoot the breeze with the petunias or parsnips, but not so bonnie Prince Charlie. The heir to the British throne is a great one for regular engagement with his vegetation. Given that this must have ensured that they are in the pink of health, it is surprising that retail giant Sainsbury’s has dropped Prince Charles’ organic vegetables on the grounds that they did not meet the right standards.

Are they barking up the wrong tree, or shall we say family tree? Turning down carrots from the House of Windsor? It would seem that the retail store is so keen on centralised and industrialised veggies that it doesn’t really care for the royal stamp on its turnips. Organic vegetables also don’t look as cosmetically appealing as those grown on an industrial scale. This could well make Charles green at the gills — after all it is royalty’s prerogative to turn down suppliers, not the other way round. Now it would seem that the crown is on the other head, even if it is lettuce. With this unkind cut, it would seem that Charles’ salad days might well be over.

Of course, he could hawk his supplies around the area of his farm where the hoi polloi might be happy to bit into a blue-blooded broccoli. But for the moment, it is certainly not strawberry fields forever for poor Charles, always a bit of a misfit in Cool Britannia. But no one should doubt that he really does know his onions when it comes to farming. For to mangle Lewis Carroll, we all know about cabbages and kings-in-waiting.