Not to be Left behind | india | Hindustan Times
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Not to be Left behind

india Updated: Feb 07, 2012 22:59 IST
Hindustan Times
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Think global, act global seems to the CPI(M)'s new motto, a variation on the old think global, act local. Well, the local bit is out of the window what with the party getting a hammering in the only two states it ruled. But, has this dampened the spirits of general secretary Prakash Karat and co? Not at all. The party's future plans have been laid out with crystal clarity by top leader Sitaram Yechury who says, "Left-wing coalitions, including communist parties that have emerged (in Latin American countries) are providing an alternative to imperialist globalisation and neo-liberalism within capitalism." The party, says the inimitable Mr Karat, is looking at conditions within India while drawing lessons from Latin American, Vietnam, even North Korea to achieve socialist conditions.

There you are, nothing to worry about, it won't be long before the comrades are back singing the Internationale at your doorstep. Of course, the Karatian vision is based on opposing casteism, communalism, gender-based exploitation, and taking into account tribal, regional and ethnic issues as well as the struggle against neo-liberal economic policies pursued by the government. When it comes to simplicity of purpose and language, you really have to hand it to the lads in the CPI(M). We admire people who are consistent. The loss of two crucial states has not shaken the confidence of the politburo. So while West Bengal's Mamata Banerjee rants about the Left's perfidy, Mr Karat will confine himself to educating the public about the relevance of Das Kapital to everyday life in the state. If this does not give Mamatadi a fright, nothing will.

We wonder what important lessons the comrades will draw from North Korea, unless it is to oppose dynastic rule which the party already does. Or could it be to exact obedience from the rank and file, which the party does not seem able to manage. One day in the distant future, Mr Karat will perhaps tell us in language we understand