NPC move to return to Indian roots | india | Hindustan Times
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NPC move to return to Indian roots

IN A bid to arouse Indian self-esteem and redefine country?s productivity movement, National Productivity Council (NPC) is working out a plan to promote Vedic and traditional methods of agriculture, bio diversity, energy generation, environment conservation that could enhance productivity in rural areas, generate employment and at the same time are sustainable.

india Updated: May 01, 2006 23:23 IST

IN A bid to arouse Indian self-esteem and redefine country’s productivity movement, National Productivity Council (NPC) is working out a plan to promote Vedic and traditional methods of agriculture, bio diversity, energy generation, environment conservation that could enhance productivity in rural areas, generate employment and at the same time are sustainable.

NPC Director General Dr Kamal Tavari said that the Council would set up Indore Chapter to create a model that would help market these technologies at national and international level. Divisional Commissioner Ashok Das will be the chairman of this Chapter. Germany Swami, a German social activist married to an Indian, will assist Das while social activist Kutty Menon will be the consultant. The Indore Chapter will institute Productivity Award as an incentive to people and development models.

“Besides, another aim is to reveal the hidden assets, positive trends prevalent in the country and project them as success stories to build self-confidence of people and inculcate a sense of pride about being Indians in them. We also want to identify rural problems, areas of concern and facilitate them in seeking solutions. NPC is looking for volunteers for this purpose,” Dr Tavari said while addressing a gathering of social activists, agriculturists, NGOs and government officials at the Commissionerate this evening.

Citing an example of positive trend, he said that there are 23 villages in crime-dominant Azamagarh (Uttar Pradesh) district where no crimes have been committed in past 40 years. “There are similar villages in north-east but no one knows about them and that is what we want to highlight,” the Director General, a 1968 IAS batch officer, said.

Giving another example, he said that people in Kanpur and Gorakhpur have compressed the bio gas in cylinder and have begun using it to drive automobiles, which is a revolutionary step.

In past six months, there has been a paradigm shift in NPC’s approach. Its focus was industries earlier, but it has shifted its focus to agriculture and rural technologies.

NPC is focusing on tracing people and organisations that have developed sustainable, rural, environment-friendly technologies that can generate employment, which will eventually prevent migration from villages to city and increase GDP. The Council will seek cooperation from village panchayats, NGOs, spiritual organisations to achieve its aim. It is holding talks with NABARD to finance the low-cost, productivity enhancing development models and people who wish to be self-employed and act as an agent of change in rural areas.

‘Integrated approach to quota needed’
INTERESTINGLY, NPC promoted the foundation of Indian Institute of Management at Ahmedabad, Bangalore and Kolkata. The Director General is the ex-officio member of these three IIMs. When Dr Tavari was asked whether he supported reservation in IIMs, he evaded a direct reply.

However, he stressed on a student’s right to have access to enabling environment and quality education. He said he has written a letter to Infosys Chairman S Narayan Murthy to keep a holistic view before taking any decision on the issue. “We need an integrated approach towards this problem,” he remarked.