Omar Abdullah’s actions only betray his political immaturity | india | Hindustan Times
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Omar Abdullah’s actions only betray his political immaturity

Pankaj Vohra’s article Omar is his own worst enemy (Between Us, October 11) was right on target and required some reading between the lines, especially with regard to the tacit support provided by the Gandhis to Omar Abdullah.

india Updated: Oct 13, 2010 23:03 IST

Omar Abdullah’s actions only betray his political immaturity

Pankaj Vohra’s article Omar is his own worst enemy (Between Us, October 11) was right on target and required some reading between the lines, especially with regard to the tacit support provided by the Gandhis to Omar Abdullah. By losing his cool in the face of adversity, the young chief minister has further muddied the waters in the Valley and shown his political immaturity. If only he had stood by his convictions, while allowing enough room for discussion and debate, he’d have been able to deal with the situation better.

Ram Lal, Delhi

Against all odds

The report Discus darlings sweep medals, make history (October 12) was heart-warming and documented a rare achievement. Krishna Poonia, Harwant Kaur and Seema Antil deserve our congratulations. Poonia’s remark that all three were from conservative Jat families is significant in light of the fact that these three medal winners come from a region where the girl child is not very welcome, leading to a distorted sex ratio. Let’s hope that their feat makes a compelling case for respecting the girl child.

Anil P. Bagarka, via email

Don’t jump the gun here

With reference to Sitaram Yechury’s article Not about blind faith (Left Hand Drive, October 12), pseudo-secularists like the author should not plead the case of a minority while trivialising the faith of the majority. Yechury, while waxing eloquent on issues beyond his expertise, should first study Indian history to understand how Hindu temples were plundered by Muslim invaders. Hindus are silently awaiting the final verdict on the Ayodhya issue and it is sad that rabble-rousers like Yechury are trying to disturb the peace.

Ashish Rai, via email

The long road to dominance

Raghav Bahl in Shanghai surprise (Superpower, October 11) portrays China as Africa’s indispensable business partner. But China is far from replacing the US and must mend its ways if it is to become a true superpower. Most markets that have been cornered by American and European companies are unlikely to provide enough room for Chinese products due to a perception about the latter being of low quality. China must first win the trust of the
major economies.

Siddharth Mehndiratta, Yamunanagar

More than an individual effort

Samar Halarnkar’s article Play it again Sam (Big Picture, October 11) was wrong in stating that the Public Information Infrastructure (PII) needs no budgetary support. Sam Pitroda’s statement that it will be funded by mandatory contributions by telecom companies is misleading. All funds collected by the State can be spent only after making the necessary provisions in the budget. Besides, such ambitious programmes can’t depend on a few
individuals alone and must be planned in a phased manner.

S.K. Wasan, Noida

Calling it like they see it

With reference to the report Nothing moves without money, says apex court (October 11), there is nothing unusual in the judges’ remarks as this is common knowledge. What’s of concern is that despite all this, the State has made no sincere efforts to root out corruption. All that is required is a stubborn determination to root out an evil that is overwhelmingly responsible for holding the country back. Both the government and ordinary people have to be a part of the solution instead of adding to the problem of corruption.

S.D. Sahay, Delhi