Ordnance Celebrates Corps Day | india | Hindustan Times
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Ordnance Celebrates Corps Day

ARMY ORDNANCE Corps celebrated its Corps Day on April, 8 2006 in the Headquarters of the Sudarshan Chakara Corps at Bhopal. To mark this occasion, a tea party was organised within the premises of the Corps Headquarters, which was attended by all officers.

india Updated: Apr 10, 2006 14:48 IST

ARMY ORDNANCE Corps celebrated its Corps Day on April, 8 2006 in the Headquarters of the Sudarshan Chakara Corps at Bhopal. To mark this occasion, a tea party was organised within the premises of the Corps Headquarters, which was attended by all officers.

Materials manager of the Indian Army has a glorious heritage spanning over two centuries. The logistics function of the Army Ordnance Corps involves the mechanics of provisioning and procuring of all stores required to raise and maintain an efficient and effective fighting Army.

The aim is to make available all kinds of stores to all units of the Army at the right time, in right quantity, at the right place and right cost.

The Corps has always lived up to its motto of “Shastra se Shakti” (Strength though arms). The Inventory range covers every conceivable requirement of the soldier from clothing to weapons, from a needle to a tank and also all munitions except fuel, fodder and medicines.

The Inventory Management functions involve Provisioning, Procurement, Receipt, Accounting, Storage, Issue, Transportation and Disposal of all Clothing/Equipment /Weapons/Vehicles and Ammunition.

Ordnance is also responsible for Ammunition Management for the complete range of Munitions from a pistol bullet to a Bofors Shell and all Missiles. In addition Ordnance is also responsible for the following:

1 Improvised Explosive Device neutralising and training in handling IEDs.

2 Major/Minor repair of all Munitions and Missiles.

3 Static and Dynamic proof of Ammunition and Explosives.

4 Disposal and Demolition of unserviceable/dangerous munitions and explosives.

Pulse Polio Sunday
Sunday, April 9 was observed as Pulse Polio day in the Bhopal Military station. Various booths were established where parents came to administer polio drops to children below five years of age in large numbers. Constant health awareness and education programmes are carried out to educate parents about the vaccination schedule and its benefits by Medical staff in the Army.

Apart from Universal Programme of Immunisation, national programmes like Pulse polio Immunisation is carried out by Station Health Organisation in the Army, which provides simultaneous immunisation of every child between 0-5 in the entire country.

The objective is to replace the polio producing wild virus with the virus, which prevents the disease or the vaccine virus, in the intestines of the children where the disease grows. By targeting each and every child in the community, there will be no place left for the wild virus to call home and cause disease in young children.

Did you know?
IN THE first 50 years of India’s independence, all organs of the State experienced deterioration and decline. It is a historical phenomenon in all developing societies. The Army has also faced this problem. However, it has maintained its functional efficiency at a far higher level than any other organ. The primary reason for this is the regimental tradition based on “esprit-de-corps”.

Only those institutions or groups can achieve substantial and lasting success, in which the interests of the individual are
subordinated to those of the institution or the group. This is a well-established phenomenon of history.

In the military, an individual is expected to voluntarily suppress his personal goals and aspirations for the sake of his group, by inculcating esprit-de-corps, which is defined as “regard for the honour and interest of the body one belongs to.” Stronger the esprit-de-corps, higher the morale,

Esprit-de-corps and morale are the two sides of the golden coin. The practice of preparing men as comrades started with Greek, but in more recent times, it was elaborated by Sir John Moore in the year 1800 in regulations for a rifle company, in the following words:

“Having formed his company… he (the Captain) will then arrange comrades. Every Corporal, Private and Bugler will select a comrade of the rank differing from his own, i.e. front or the rear rank, and is never to change him without the permission of his captain. Comrades are always to have the same berth in quarters; and that they may be as little separated as possible, in either barracks or field; will join the same file on parade, and go on the same duties with arms when it is with baggage also.”     

Columnist can be reached at ambreen2you@gmail.com or ambreen2you@yahoo.co.in