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Original clones

Remixes have made front door entry into B'wood with almost every film mixing its original, writes Malvika Nanda.

india Updated: May 16, 2006 15:16 IST

If you are relieved that musicians have finally got tired of remixing old songs with skin show for visual impact, then perhaps, you haven’t noticed that remixes have already made a front door entry into Bollywood films.

Almost every movie these days has at least one remix of its own song, which are the new tickets for box office sales. Loy Mendonsa of the Shankar-EhsanLoy trio says, “In an age when films are made only to mint money and not to spread any message, remixes have emerged as a strong selling point."

New credibility

Remixes like Woh Lamhe (Zeher), Aashiq Banaya and Aap Ki Kashish (Aashiq Banaya Aap ne), Jhalak Dikh laja and Lagi Lagi (Aksar) are still ruling the airwaves. Recent releases like 36 China Town, Tom, Dick and Harry and Gangster too have hit the remix jackpot with Ashiqi Mein Meri, Zara Jhoom and Tu Hi Meri Shab Hai respectively. So, have remixes turned a new leaf of respectability, without raunchy videos or defiling golden oldies? Looks like as it’s no longer remix pioneers such as DJs (Aqueel, Nikhil Chinapa, Suketu) but film music directors too who are getting into the act.

Youth anthem

Himesh Reshammiya, who has mastered the art of whipping up hits, says, "Youngsters, an important part of the market, are loving it. My remixes and originals have appeared together in the same album and that has helped the film." Mahesh Bhatt, whose Vishesh Films has buttressed the tr end through its recent releases, says: “Today, the audience likes to hear music which makes it numb and gives instant gratification too.” He prefers to call these ‘panAsian’ songs.

Quality check

Vishal Dadlani of the Vishal-Shekhar duo, however, cautions: "The trend will lose its freshness if people begin dishing out sub-standard stuff." He adds that remix videos are good as promotional tools but justified only if they have some connect with the movie.

Right now, the trend seems to be rocking as people are just lapping up these songs. Is it time already for clones to overtake the originals?