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Pain killer halts the cause of breast cancer

A study says that pain killers halt the production of an enzyme that leads to breast cancer.

india Updated: Mar 31, 2006 13:24 IST

A pain–killing medication appears to halt the production of an enzyme that is key to a common form of breast cancer, a new study using tissue cultures suggests.

The drug is called nimesulide. In laboratory experiments on breast cancer cells, scientists found that derivatives of nimesulide stopped the production of aromatase, the enzyme implicated in estrogen-dependent breast cancer.

This form of breast cancer is the most common kind of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

Aromatase converts hormones called androgens into estrogens, such as the hormone estradiol.

Estrogen is a powerful mitogen – an agent that causes cells to divide, and too much estrogen can cause cells to divide too quickly.

While many women with estrogen-dependent breast cancer take aromatase inhibitors to control their disease, the problem is that the current inhibitor drugs halt estrogen production throughout the body, said Robert Brueggemeier, a study co-author and a professor of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy and dean of the College of Pharmacy at Ohio State University.

“That means that other tissues, like bone and brain, which rely on normal aromatase production, may suffer,” he said. “For one, we think that aromatase helps to maintain bone tissue throughout the postmenopausal period. Current aromatase inhibitors may disturb normal bone production there is some suggestion that these drugs may increase the risk of fractures.”

The study's results suggest that nimesulide may block aromatase production only in breast tissue.

Nimesulide is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), a drug that controls pain and inflammation. Studies of other NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, have suggested that NSAIDs may reduce breast cancer incidence by 40 percent.

However, these drugs tend to halt aromatase production throughout the body.

He said that the next step is to study how the analogs affect other types of tissues to make sure that nimesulide's aromatase-inhibiting effects are truly isolated to breast tissue.

“Then we need to conduct animal studies to learn how effective these compounds are when they are actually inside the body and what the potential side effects may be,”Brueggemeier said.