Pakistan is pointing fingers at the wronged party | india | Hindustan Times
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Pakistan is pointing fingers at the wronged party

Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi’s statement that he does not expect India to cooperate with the 26/11 investigations is ridiculous (Pak: Little use talking to India, September 17).

india Updated: Sep 21, 2009 22:15 IST

Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi’s statement that he does not expect India to cooperate with the 26/11 investigations is ridiculous (Pak: Little use talking to India, September 17). Everybody knows how Pakistan is procrastinating over the matter by not taking action against the 26/11 suspects. This is the reason why India had requested the US to intervene and put pressure on Pakistan. By accusing India, Pakistan is unnecessarily delaying the issue further.

M. Subrahmany, via email

Why so serious, Congress?

It is surprising that Minister of State for External Affairs Shashi Tharoor is being criticised for his tweets (Pulling our leg space, The Pundit, September 18). While Tharoor should be more circumspect while airing his views on a social networking website, the Congress should also see the lighter side of his messages. Making a mountain out of a molehill goes against the party’s interest. Tharoor seems unaware of the fact that his actions can have serious consequences.

R.K. Kutty, Bhopal

II

Those who feel uncomfortable with Tharoor’s comments seem to lack a healthy sense of humour. By calling economy-class travellers ‘cattle class’, he hasn’t denigrated the common man. The term is widely used in the West and, unlike Congress leaders, people there don’t make an issue out of it. It’s high time we stopped overreacting to new terminology and let people enjoy their right to expression.

Neha Rathi, Delhi

Put an end to the Naxal menace

The police deserve accolades for destroying the Naxal base in Chhattisgarh (Cops launch assault on Naxals, kill 30, September 19) The Naxals are slowly, but steadily, strengthening their hold in Chhattisgarh and in neighbouring areas. It is a myth that they are modern-day Robin Hoods working for the welfare of the poor. They pose a serious threat to our internal security. The government should provide better facilities to the defence forces to weed out the Naxalites.

Mukesh Advani, Delhi

India needs judicial reforms

The report Some order, my lord (September 17) reconfirms that the judiciary is losing its credibility due to archaic laws. The judicial system also suffers from a lack of transparency, which raises questions over its working style. People are slowly losing faith in the system. The country urgently needs legal reforms to improve the system.

Abhishek Nagar, Delhi