Pakistanis must speak up else extremists will succeed | india | Hindustan Times
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Pakistanis must speak up else extremists will succeed

reference to Karan Thapar’s article Hindsight’s too late (Sunday Sentiments, January 16), people wish for peace and the people of Pakistan are no exception. But the silence of the educated class over Punjab governor Salman Taseer’s killing is painful.

india Updated: Jan 23, 2011 00:04 IST

Pakistanis must speak up else extremists will succeed

With reference to Karan Thapar’s article Hindsight’s too late (Sunday Sentiments, January 16), people wish for peace and the people of Pakistan are no exception. But the silence of the educated class over Punjab governor Salman Taseer’s killing is painful. It seems Pakistanis have become reluctant to raise their voice against religious fundamentalism. The lawyers, considered as harbingers of democracy, are supporting a man accused of a ghastly act. The United Nations should take note of the situation before Pakistan becomes a puppet in the hands of fanatics.

Rakesh Sherawat, via email

II

The brutal murder of Taseer is a blow to civil society and minority communities in the country. Pakistan is standing at a dangerous threshold, with its government unable to rein in the extremists and the army unable to steer the country towards peace. Such a situation can lead to a collapse of governance. No neighbour wants Pakistan to reach such a condition. The beleaguered nation must arrest the decay.

RD Singh, Ambala

III

Thapar’s analysis is an expression of wild worries. A State actively supported by the US is unlikely to collapse. Terrorists are at best obstructionists. We Indians would do better in keeping our house in order.Citizens of other nations do not like to receive prescriptions about their internal political matters.

Navendu Mahodaya, Indore

Cricketers evolve from gentlemen to slaves

Sharda Ugra in Big sale at the slave market (Sunday Guest Column, January 16) is right in stating that feudalism continues to dominate Indian cricket. The Indian Premier League (IPL) has reduced the great players to slaves as they are auctioned and are willing to serve the highest bidder. The price is the only factor kept in mind, the players are secondary. It is a ‘cricket mandi’ where players are sold as in a vegetable market.

GK Arora, Delhi

II The IPL auction favoured younger players to older ones to make the season more interesting and aggressive. Experience was not considered a virtue. The way cricketers were bought and sold at the IPL auction reminds us of the way in which slaves were traded in the Roman empire. Of course, today we make celebrities out of the players bought at outrageous prices who participate in masala matches to earn more money for the team owners. It’s a shame for the gentleman’s game.

Bhagwan B Thadani, Mumbai

III

Money is now more important than anything else. No wonder cricketers are willing to sell themselves in IPL’s slave market. It pays well to play and entertain the public. In the process, they earn name, fame and money. The better ones sell themselves to the highest bidder while some go a-begging. Earlier, they were slaves to the BCCI, now they are sold in the open market.

J Chellappa, via email

The right read

After reading Indrajit Hazra’s write-up A literary trickery (Red Herring, January 16), I was elated to see that at least some people in the print media have spoken out against the Twilight and the Chetan Bhagat frenzy that has diminished the capacity of my generation to appreciate real literature. In high school, I used to be mocked if seen with a Pearl Buck or Dostoevsky, eliciting comments like ‘heavy stuff padh raha hai’. I don’t completely disagree but it irks me when people refer to Stephanie Meyer’s novels as classics even though they’re less than a decade old. Hazra really hit the bull's eye with the reverse snobbery bit.

Dev Dutta, via email

II

Hazra’s article was an interesting read. It is strange how people boasting about not reading inevitably turns the serious reader’s ear scarlet over their very serious reading, as if having a couple of extra grey cells is the preserve of a closet intellectual.

Ari Azim, via email

Time to make way

Khushwant Singh’s column Will this be the year of reckoning for the UPA govt? (With Malice Towards One and All, January 16) is no more contextual and serves only as a tail-end joke. Why important space in the newspaper is being wasted while this weekly column has obviously run its course is something one fails to understand.

Ganesh Sahu, via email

French letter

With reference to the report It’s great to be alive in India now (January 21), there are three errors. I did not say these words “It’s great to be alive in India right now”, or not without qualification. Presented outside the context in which they were spoken, they are inaccurate. The description “now shuttles between his homes in London and Delhi” is incorrect; my home is in London, I do not have a home in Delhi. I was not referring “ironically” to Rahul Gandhi. I said what I believe.

Patrick French, via email