Panicky ?CEOs? eyeball their armour! | india | Hindustan Times
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Panicky ?CEOs? eyeball their armour!

india Updated: Nov 16, 2006 00:06 IST
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MAJORITY OF city’s business who’s who have personal security but they still feel unsafe, especially after the NOIDA incident in which Abobe India CEO’s three-year-old boy was kidnapped in broad daylight.

Is personal security no good? What’s that which still makes the city’s business class feel vulnerable? The reason is that private guards are not generally trained to handle abductions and are scantily armed to serve the purpose.

There are over 50,000 security personnel employed with 200  small private security agencies in the city. Nearly 40 per cent of the security personnel are ex-servicemen having arms licence for rifles instead of pistols or revolvers.

“Our security costs at home and factory premises have gone up by 5 per cent per month,” says managing director Tarun Khetrapal of Kripal Textile Mills.

He says the State Government should provide gunners more to the State’s industrialists than providing security cover to small politicians who sometimes more around with three gunners!

A global private security firm Eagle Hunter Solutions Ltd did announce its plans to open an academy for training private security personnel here. However, the status of the project is not yet known. The company’s Chairman B R Lohia could not be contacted for comment.

“Your private security guard isn’t trained to handle crisis situations such as abductions or even an armed attack by miscreants while you are on your way to the office,” says Retec Rubber Products Ltd managing director Kiron Chopra. He is also member of the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII). “Private security merely provides a psychological protection. It’s an eyewash. You cannot rely on an armed private security guard to protect you or your family,” he says..

“Why just NOIDA? You feel vulnerable about the security of your loved ones even in the State Capital. A businessman staying right across the road from my house was shot dead last year by some miscreants in Nirala Nagar in broad daylight,” Chopra says.

The State Government needs to evolve a policy to provide arms training to the private security personnel. And it’s not just private security guards but also the policemen who should be sent for regular training to deal with security issues involving the corporate world, he says.

Ashutosh Soti, CEO, Norbell, says that private security guards don’t carry firearms which could help them effectively counter abductions or an armed attack as their heavy guns may not work when it is time to shoot.

Last year a general manager of a public sector undertaking received life threats from a mafia don and had to hire an armed security guard for his protection when he moved around the city.

Asked whether the tall security guard with a double-barrel gun hanging from his shoulder was capable to protect him, Soti laughs saying : “Do you think this man with this heavy gun would even be able to take it off his shoulder in time if somebody attacks me?”

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