Patients spoilt for choice | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Feb 22, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Patients spoilt for choice

india Updated: May 17, 2010 22:52 IST
Sanjeev K Ahuja
Sanjeev K Ahuja
Hindustan Times
Gurgaon

Mention the modern face of Gurgaon and you tend to picture megaplexes and high-rises. Now you can throw another image into the mix: superspeciality hospitals.

Delhi's southwestern suburb is witnessing a boom in specialized healthcare like never before.

The numbers tell the story: Dr Umesh Gupta, the promoter of MP Heart Centre in Greater Kailash in New Delhi, is soon to set up his third hospital in a row in Gurgaon in DLF City. Dr Naresh Trehan's 43-acre Medanta Medicity came up in February this year. Another giant, Fortis Healthcare. is in the midst of building the 950-bedded Fortis International Institute of Medical Sciences (FIIMS) on a 7.5-acres sprawl.

State-run and run-down

As the case with Noida, lack of public health infrastructure has created an atmosphere ripe for private hospitals to thrive.

The shabby condition of state-run hospitals in Gurgaon was revealed at its nadir during last year's outbreak of H1N1 (swine flu) virus, when 40-50 per cent of Gurgaon's patients poured into Delhi for treatment. The 200-bedded Civil Hospital here is still to have an ICU and ventilator.

Competion is healthy

The multiplicity of players on the Gurgaon healthcare scene not only ensures patients have a plethora of options, but also keeps costs in check.

Competition amongst various players spells into a rain of discount packages and schemes. For instance, the Alchemist Institute of Medical Sciences, headed by former AIIMS chief Dr. Venogopal, performs a coronary artery bypass surgery for Rs 85,000, which normally costs above Rs 1.5 lakh elsewhere.

What's more, Gurgaon is fast emerging as a center for medical tourism. Experts say about 80-100 patients from outside India get admitted in various hospitals in Gurgaon every day and the number is likely to increase to 250 in the an year's time.

"Gurgaon is expanding fast vertically with bustling corporate and residential activity,” says Dr Gupta. “Besides numbers, the profile of the people living here is unmatched and they need quality healthcare treatment at competitive pricing. This is what made us expand from one hospital in Sushant Lok (1996) to setting up another in Palam Vihar in February. We have tied up with Panacea to launch our third 250-bedded hospital in DLF City-III.”

The best news though is that the competitive bug may have finally bitten the government sector as well. The Haryana government — in a bid to finally give its orthodox-looking 200-bedded Civil Hospital a “corporate look” and procure modern equipment — has tied up with National Building Construction Corporation (NBCC.)

New kids on the block
Several new tertiaty care hospitals are in the process of setting up shop in Gurgaon.

Alchemist Institute of Medical Sciences
USP: Cardiac care
Bed strength 150-bedded Alchemist Institute of Medical Sciences headed by former AIIMS chief
Cost matters: Dr. Venogopal does a coronary artery bypass surgery for Rs 85,000 which normally costs above Rs 1.6 lakh elsewhere. A single valve replacement costs Rs 1 lakh and double Rs. 1.5 lakh, almost 100 percent less than the market price in Delhi.

Umkal Metro Hospital, Palam Vihar
USP: Tertiary facility in the cardiac, child and mother and intensive care,
Cost matters: Tthis hospital offers OPD for all kind just for Rs. 200-300. Room tariff around Rs. 3000. Angiography in general ward Rs. 8000, angioplasty
Rs 50,000 plus the cost of stent and wall bladder removal with laparoscopic surgery for Rs 15-20,000.

Civil Hospital
USP: Low-cost surgeries
Cost matters: Surgeries for hernia, fistula, done for Rs. 3000-5000 that cost the patients between Rs 40000 and 70000 in private hospitals.
Patients of below poverty line (BPL) and those from notified slums operated free of cost.
Caesarian operations, deliveries, glaucoma operations are free

Fortis’s 7-star medicity
USP: Super specialities ranging from oncology, emergency care, cosmetology.
Bed strength: Projectecd 950.
32 operation theaters, 250 critical care beds.

Talk to us: Has poor healthcare in NCR affected you? Are private hospitals the only option in Delhi’s suburbs? Write to us at: htreporters@hindustantimes.com