PM Modi gets set for tour to Saudi Arabia, Brussels and US | india | Hindustan Times
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PM Modi gets set for tour to Saudi Arabia, Brussels and US

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will travel to Saudi Arabia — home to the largest number of Indian passport holders outside India — and attend the India-European Union Summit in Brussels as well as the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington towards the end of next month.

india Updated: Feb 29, 2016 01:26 IST
HT Correspondent
Modi foreign tours
The PM’s three-nation trip will begin on March 30 with Belgium.(AP File Photo)

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will travel to Saudi Arabia — home to the largest number of Indian passport holders outside India — and attend the India-European Union Summit in Brussels as well as the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington towards the end of next month.

The PM’s three-nation trip will begin on March 30 with Belgium. Modi will then travel to Washington for the summit from March 31 before his two-day visit to Saudi Arabia from April 2.

Modi was to attend the summit in Washington from March 31. His Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif too will attend the meet that presents the possibility of the two leaders meeting in the US. Though sources are tight-lipped about the Sharif-Modi meeting, the two sides are working on expediting the probe in the Pathankot air base attack.

This will be the first time after Modi’s unannounced and brief visit to Lahore on December 25 that he and Sharif will be at the same venue. Since his previous visit, the Pathankot terror attack has delayed the Indo-Pak foreign secretary-level talks scheduled to take place in early January after the two countries announced resumption of comprehensive talks.

In Saudi Arabia, Modi will hold talks with the leadership on key regional and bilateral issues, including trade and energy.

The PM will attend the India-EU Summit in Belgium after four years. Since the last summit in 2012, India and the 28-member trading bloc have struggled to iron out some crucial differences.