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PM's going off at a tangent

The Prime Minister’s made a point during his speech at the Hindustan Times Leadership Summit saying that ‘By the end of the accounting year we will achieve 8 per cent growth’.

india Updated: Nov 25, 2008 00:22 IST

PM's going off at a tangent
The Prime Minister’s made a point during his speech at the Hindustan Times Leadership Summit saying that ‘By the end of the accounting year we will achieve 8 per cent growth’. This is a joke with most sectors showing a downturn and several Indians losing their jobs in the IT, banking, textile, aviation and auto sectors. Why is the PM painting a rosy picture when the coming year look like they will bring a major recession? It is important to study the trends associated with an economic meltdown before giving lofty speeches at any forum.
Shivani Maheshwari, Gurgaon

Demolition for development
With reference to the editorial Modi’s raze daze (The Pundit, November 21), Gujarat CM Narendra Modi deserves congratulations for taking a bold step. Development needs are often met by dealing with such issues with a firm hand. Whether Hindus, Sikhs or Muslims, no one should be allowed to set up religious buildings on the roadside which can hamper traffic and cause dangerous obstructions. Where there is public interest involved, people should come forward voluntarily and clear the roads. Temples, mosques etc. can be set up at authorised places with the permission of the government. Constructing religious structures on government land, parks or the roadside is an unfortunate trend in our country.
LR Sabharwal, via email

II
Narendra Modi’s action against 152 encroaching roadside temples is a brave one. There is a general impression that a building for worship cannot be demolished, no matter where it is situated. It is thought that the best way of preventing a plot of a land from being acquired is to construct a religious building or memorial on it. Religious sentiments are used as a shield against the law-enforcing agencies. Modi’s act should serve as a warning to those who think that religion is above the law.
VS Sharma, Gurgaon

III
Narendra Modi has done the right thing by demolishing obstructing temples. Construction of roadside temples has become the easiest way of encroaching on public spaces, by exploiting the religious sentiments of people. In Delhi one can find a number of such temples and mosques, virtually blocking the footpaths and causing a lot of inconvenience to the public. Other states should follow Gujarat’s example and do away with such encroachments. People must support such action.
KN Rajan, Delhi

Public disconnect
I wonder what purpose the Hindustan Times Leadership Summit served for the common man. Out of eight foreign speakers, only Asif Ali Zardari was of any importance as far as India is concerned. The majority of Indian speakers failed to connect with the common man. Incidentally, there was no one representing the Left parties, almost as if they were not worthy of being part of the Summit.
Pradeep Krishan, via email

The lotus is wilting
Apropos of the editorial Hindutva begets ultra-Hindutva (Our Take, November 22), the BJP’s thrust has been on consolidating the Hindu vote-bank to wrest power at the Centre. The Malegaon episode has been a setback for the party as this has turned its terror plank upside down. This has forced the BJP into a state of denial, if only to keep the Sangh parivar pleased, since it has little cadre build-up of its own. The party’s goal is to get back to power at the Centre in 2009.
Janaki Narayanan, via email