Power cuts in Kashmir increase demand for Chinese electronics | india | Hindustan Times
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Power cuts in Kashmir increase demand for Chinese electronics

Power shortages in Jammu and Kashmir have increased the demand for low-price and durable Chinese electronics. A customer, Lateef Ahmad, said Chinese products were very popular in Srinagar and across India. "We get various models of these lights; Chinese products are sold not only in Kashmir but also in various other states.

india Updated: Jan 08, 2014 13:55 IST
ANI

Power shortages in Jammu and Kashmir have increased the demand for low-price and durable Chinese electronics. A customer, Lateef Ahmad, said Chinese products were very popular in Srinagar and across India.


"We get various models of these lights; Chinese products are sold not only in Kashmir but also in various other states.

People purchase these products as they are cheaper than others. Besides,we have electricity shortage issues here and it becomes very difficult in winters, so people prefer to use Chinese products-whether it is a light or a phone," said Ahmad.

With the world turning into a global village and competition getting taut, countries like China rule the roost in the Indian market, which is the hub for diverse business opportunities.

A dealer of Chinese lights, Imtiyaz Ahmad, said that people prefer these lights on account of their low cost and durability.

"People here prefer these lights as they are not expensive. The light works well for several months and if there is a problem, the battery can be changed to make it operational for a couple of years more," said Ahmad.

Kashmir was once dubbed the Switzerland of the east. It was once a Mecca for climbers, skiers, honeymooners and filmmakers drawn to the state's soaring peaks, fruit orchards and timber houseboats bobbing on Dal Lake in Srinagar.

Plane loads of India's upwardly mobile middle classes have visited the picture postcard-perfect Kashmir valley this summer, making it the busiest tourist season since the armed revolt began in 1989.

In wake of the decline in violence in India's Kashmir, one gets to see various development activities taking place in every sector.