Promised jobs abroad, they landed in jail | india | Hindustan Times
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Promised jobs abroad, they landed in jail

Milan Pardesi (name changed on request), an unemployed youth from Uttar Pradesh, sold off his ancestral land to go to Dubai, where he was promised a job. He landed up in a Mumbai jail instead, reports Soubhik Mitra.

india Updated: Apr 07, 2009 01:25 IST
Soubhik Mitra

Milan Pardesi (name changed on request), an unemployed youth from Uttar Pradesh, sold off his ancestral land to go to Dubai, where he was promised a job.

He landed up in a Mumbai jail instead.

Pardesi is among the hundreds of victims who fall prey to trafficking rackets run by people disguising themselves as overseas placements agents, with help from airline staffers. And Mumbai, being well connected to most international destinations, has become a hub of human trafficking.

The Sahar police station — the international terminal of the Mumbai airport comes under its jurisdiction — has arrested 55 people like Pardesi this year.

“It is a socio-economic problem. Most of them are unemployed and fall for the trap,” said Senior Inspector Dilip Patil. “Several of those arrested have sold their belongings to fund the trip.”

The police have arrested 14 agents and two airline employees this year.

The recent arrests have also exposed the role played by airline employees in aiding these syndicates.

On February 25, the Crime Branch arrested two Air India staffers, Deepak Salvi and Hemant Borade, for allegedly misusing their free ticket quotas to send two women to the US posing as their wives.

The US Consulate found that the duo returned within a few days from their visit to the US, without their “wives”.

The matter was reported to the Air India vigilance department and the scandal was cracked.

The two had pasted the photos of the women they were taking abroad on the original passports of their wives. After returning, they applied for new passports for their wives, saying the originals had been damaged or were lost.

“Airline staffers work as aides, but we find it difficult to establish their involvement because they do not participate actively. In some cases, they were caught on the closed-circuit television cameras, helping the agents,” added Patil.