Puckered justice | india | Hindustan Times
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Puckered justice

In the present era of Sri Emraan ‘Serial Kisser’ Hashmi, what’s all the fuss over kissing, eh? But put the same question to Delhi policemen and you’ll find yourself behind bars and in front of a courtroom judge, in that order. Rajiv Arora elaborates.

india Updated: Feb 10, 2009 21:54 IST
Rajiv Arora

In the present era of Sri Emraan ‘Serial Kisser’ Hashmi, what’s all the fuss over kissing, eh? But put the same question to Delhi policemen Vidyadhar Singh and Roshan Lal and you’ll find yourself behind bars and in front of a courtroom judge, in that order.

So the Singh-Lal duo did what they did after catching a couple in an ‘objectionable position’ near a Metro pillar in Dwarka last September. The lovebirds justified their action as a mode of ‘time-pass’. But the explanation wasn’t enough. Our Big Boys of Morality had by then lodged an FIR. Unfortunately, the judge took a different view on the matter this month. He pronounced the couple innocent. Now the Delhi Police have been made to apologise, stressing that they do not have any intention of going around policing morals anymore.

The ‘problem’ actually lies with both parties. Neither could resist the temptation of doing what could have been avoided.

Both actions — the amorous and the one involving ‘law and order’ — were spontaneous. And, as it turned out, both were made to repent for their over-enthusiasm. While the couple did get a bit over-adventurous on the streets of Delhi, our very own Keystone Cops took the matter a bit too seriously, beating the likes of the Sri Rama Sene to the post.

The wise judge crushed the dreams, of becoming household names, of our two enthusiastic policemen when he concluded, keeping in mind that the couple could also have done more than what they did, that Singh and Lal didn’t go over the top in playing the moral police. The media, too, had better things to cover. Which, three days before the Valentine’s Day when all moral police-types seek their 15 minutes of fame, gives us some clues about how we media persons should treat these busybodies. What, by ignoring them, of course.