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Punjabi folk feast enthralls

THE FOURTH day of the week long silver jubilee celebrations saw Bharat Bhavan?s environs resonating with rocking Punjabi music and dance to spellbind the audience with vibrant splashes of colours, foot tapping rhythms and swirling body movements while swaying to the traditional folk songs from the land of ?Bhangra? and ?Gidda?.

india Updated: Feb 17, 2007 14:48 IST

THE FOURTH day of the week long silver jubilee celebrations saw Bharat Bhavan’s environs resonating with rocking Punjabi music and dance to spellbind the audience with vibrant splashes of colours, foot tapping rhythms and swirling body movements while swaying to the traditional folk songs from the land of ‘Bhangra’ and ‘Gidda’.

The folklore held at Bahirang Rangshala lent a serene touch to these cultural presentations, with art lovers registering a huge presence to savour this musical bonanza.

The first session of the programme took off with a group dance recital rendered by 22-member troupe from Patiala representing the North Cultural Zone. This folk orchestra opening, executed to the tunes of Prof. Major Singh Chaddha, set the mood for the rest of the evening that reverberated with archetypal melodies and dance recitals performed on various auspicious occasions in Punjab.

For instance Jindova is a famous folk dance which captures light moments between a married couple when a wife lists out a demand for purchase- items characteristically belonging to well-known cities all over the country.

While ‘Mehndi’ is a folk dance usually performed at ladies get together before the wedding of a girl. Raaji and Manpreet performed this item on the liltingly sung song Gidde Vich NachDi…Mehndi..Mehndi..

But the piece that dominated the recitals was ‘Malvai Giddha’ presented by young Punjabi men in full vigour and vitality to refresh the memories of celebrations in undivided Punjab when farmers used to gyrate on rural folk songs while rejoicing their new crops in the harvest season. Earlier, the young boys and girls from Patiala also presented ‘Naag’, a musical rendition along with a dance drama on Mirza Sahiba’s love story.

The harmonic progressions emanating from traditional instruments like Tumbi, Kato, Sap, Chimta, Algoza, Bugdu, Dholki and Gadwa complemented the high energy exhibited by these talented folk artistes that exuded brilliant vivacity.  
The second session at Antarang was devoted to divine magic. Punjabi Sufi Singer Yunis Gill beautifully voiced out some mystical compositions of legends like Bulle Shah, Baba Farid and Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan.

He kicked off with Shah Husain’s ‘ Mein Changiya Ya Mangiya, Mein Aakhir teri Bandiya’. Gill strikingly blended pain and pleasure in his rich tapestry while beckoning God and went on to regale the listeners with some more offerings like Tere Ishq Nachayi and Akhiyan Adim Piya . However, the only downer that upset the audience was the schedule of the programme that started an hour late.