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Put the fresh face forward

As sweat and dirt accumulate, here’s how you can give your face a good wash, Sujata Reddy shares the tips.

india Updated: Jun 10, 2009 16:37 IST
Sujata Reddy

Choosing the right soap is often a daunting task. Even more so because experts give soap the thumbs down for its fatty acid salt content, that is known to be harsh on the skin.

Experts say that the key to clean skin lies in picking a soap or face wash that is in tandem with your skin type. “There is no harm in soaping your body but for the face I’d recommend a suitable face wash,” says Shoma Ghosh of Nivea.

The problem with soap, she says, is that it makes the skin very dry. “Soap-based face washes and cleansers cause the surface oil and oil within the pores to harden and the result is not flattering. So one should always scout for a product that moisturisers as well,” she says.

Customise it
Always consult a dermatologist to know your skin type before zeroing down on a skincare product. Dr Charulata Bose, dermatologist, Artemis Health Institute says, “People with sensitive skin should opt for a glycerine-based soap wash and make sure it has no chemicals. Soap is a complete no-no for them. Those with normal skin can use a mild soap. If you have dry skin, keep it soap-free and use a facewash.”

Experts say that one should not use soap or facewash more than twice a day. “Instead , keep splashing water on your face. There are anti-bacterial soaps available in the market but one should avoid them because they erode the residence flora bacteria from the skin,” Bose adds.

In summers, it is a good idea to go for an exfoliating face wash as it removes excess oil and provides deep cleansing. However, you can obtain optimum results when you club the facewash with a toner and a cream— a sun block and a night cream. Beauty expert Beenu Bawa suggests the “old school way of cleansing the face”.“Using oil or fruit pulp as organic alternatives is a good therapy,” she says.

(Inputs from Neha Sharma)