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Quota students not doing well

IF THE students and the faculty members at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT-K) were to be believed, the students of reserved category though did fairly well in the examinations, they faced tough time during placement through campus interview. Neither the IIT-K authorities nor the Senate members preferred to divulge any information about the performance of students belonging to the SC and ST at the examinations.

india Updated: Apr 13, 2006 00:08 IST

Facing tough time in getting placement through campus interviews

IF THE students and the faculty members at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT-K) were to be believed, the students of reserved category though did fairly well in the examinations, they faced tough time during placement through campus interview.

Neither the IIT-K authorities nor the Senate members preferred to divulge any information about the performance of students belonging to the SC and ST at the examinations.

According to them the data information was confidential and was sent directly to the Union Ministry for Human Resources Development (MHRD). It was the prerogative of the MHRD to divulge it to any person or institution.

However, the student members of the Senate who also have the information about the performance data but they too do not divulge it in the interest of campus unity and dignity.

According to them, publication of these data might cause embarrassment to the candidates of general and the reserved categories alike and hence they also preferred to keep it confidential.

However, students and faculty members admitted that there were about 118 reserved seats for the SC and ST students but all the reserved seats are not filled every year. Most of the students of these two categories are first admitted to the Slow Pace Programme (SPP), specially designed for them. Under the programme they were taught about the basics of different subjects. If they qualified this examination they were admitted to regular courses according to their merit.

Results of the past few years have shown that the reserved category candidates took more time in clearing the SPP as compared to the general category candidates who were also referred to the SPP programme for their poor performance in mathematics and physics.

Besides, a good number of reserved category students often take more ‘years’ to clear the final course.

But the number of such candidates has been found declining during the past three years for the reasons that most of these students hailed from the SC and ST families, which have already been benefited by the reservation and were in a position to impart better education to their children.

So far not a single SC or ST candidate could get admission whose parents were not among the beneficiaries of reservation policy in any way.

According to the general category students and the faculty members, the reserved class students form their own groups and keep themselves isolated from other students, which adversely affect their personality growth.

There could be no other effect so worst as this, upon the minds of the reserved category students the faculty members said.