Rally against the greater evil | india | Hindustan Times
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Rally against the greater evil

I admire Zafar Hilaly’s views as expressed in Swallowing up Pakistan (April 17). Now is the time for Pakistanis to stand up against the Taliban’s brutality and revive democracy in their country.

india Updated: Apr 19, 2009 21:11 IST

I admire Zafar Hilaly’s views as expressed in Swallowing up Pakistan (April 17). Now is the time for Pakistanis to stand up against the Taliban’s brutality and revive democracy in their country. For that, they should stop blaming foreign powers, including India, for the present turmoil in their land. No one, including the US, can help them overcome the crisis unless they raise their voice against Taliban rule. Also, India and Pakistan should work together for a mutually beneficial future. Pakistan needs our help to restore stability in the region. India must assist Pakistan as the Taliban can be an equally big threat to our nation in times to come.

A.K. SAXENA, Delhi

Down but certainly not out

This is with reference to the editorial Let ballots, not bullets, rule (Our Take, April 17). In the first phase of the general elections, our country witnessed a triumph of democracy despite the Naxals’ attempt to disrupt the voting exercise. The credit goes to the brave security personnel who sacrificed their lives for the nation, officials who diligently conducted the polls in sensitive areas and people who came out in large numbers to cast their vote. We must condemn the Naxals for their cowardly act. The new government will have to consider their resentment against the State seriously and will have to address matters that affect them.

Bapu Satyanarayana, Mysore

They’ve nothing relevant to say

We hoped to see our leaders discussing their parties’ strategies on matters related to foreign affairs, defence, the economy, education, health and terrorism in their speeches. Instead, we hear them criticising their opponents and passing personal remarks about each other. Most of their public discourses are entertaining but irrelevant and lack substance. We are yet to hear a statesman-like speech from our politicians.

D.C. Pandey, via email

Young blood, old ideologies

Apropos of Ashok Malik’s article Coming round the mountain (April 16), these elections were supposed to symbolise a changing India. But, divisions based on caste, community, religion and sects have rendered the situation grim. While our nation depends on young, energetic leaders to infuse modernity and new ideologies in our politics, they have disappointed us with their communal speeches and immature gestures. We wonder if young leaders will even be able to deal with the country’s problems like those related to poverty, terrorism and price rise?

Aakash Agarwal, Varanasi

Now hold your peace

It is surprising to learn how a handful of politicians have criticised the release of militants in exchange for innocent passengers in the 2006 Kandahar incident. Such criticism is meaningless for if these politicians had any alternative solution to resolve the crisis, they did not voice it at that time. God forbid, had the members of these politicians’ families been among those ill-fated passengers in IC-814, would they have still opposed the move? No prizes for guessing the answer.

J.N. Mahanty, Puri