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Reform power sector

With reference to the editorial To not be powerless (May 1) which talked of the failure of Delhi?s distcoms, we?d like to say that NDPL areas of north and north-west Delhi have seen great success in distribution reforms.

india Updated: May 08, 2006 00:24 IST

With reference to the editorial To not be powerless (May 1) which talked of the failure of Delhi’s distcoms, we’d like to say that NDPL areas of north and north-west Delhi have seen great success in distribution reforms. The editorial hasn’t presented a realistic picture of reforms.

NDPL has achieved 25 per cent reduction in its AT & C losses in the last three years. It has used technology efficiently to reduce power thefts, with savings to the tune of Rs 1,500 cr as a result of such initiatives.

Shekhar Singh
GM, Administration
North Delhi Power Ltd.

II

The directives issued by the Power Ministry to manage the power crisis in Delhi management are amusing (Longer cuts as plant shuts, May 5). But it is silent on the need to deal with power thieves who don’t care about these restrictions, as they have illegal connections and don’t pay bills.

In Delhi, above 40 per cent of the power distribution ends up as loss. If this is reduced, power cuts will go down due to reduced wastage and better system parameters.

J. Srinivasan

Delhi

Not a minor issue

The report Minority tag to escape quota (May 5) quotes National Commission for Minority Educational Institutions officials that the Supreme Court in the St Stephen’s case has stated that “50 per cent seats should be reserved for the community for which minority status is being sought.” This is not correct.

This judgment states that the minority institution can give preference to candidates from its own community but the intake in this category must be “with due regard to the need of the community in the area which the institution is intended to serve. But in no case such intake shall exceed 50 per cent of the annual admission”.

Thus, in an area where the minority population is say 5 per cent, then the intake of minority candidates would be relative to this figure. Where the minority population is 60 per cent, then the intake of minority candidates cannot be more than 50 per cent. It is such misrepresentation of judgments that agitates the mind of youngsters and creates tensions.

Anil Wilson

St Stephen’s College

Delhi

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