Rise in cases gets Thane civic body to take preventive action | india | Hindustan Times
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Rise in cases gets Thane civic body to take preventive action

A 55-year-old woman, who was suffering from malaria, died of cardio-respiratory failure on Thursday morning. Nalini Pardesi, a resident of Kharkhar Lane, had a history of heart disease, low blood pressure and diabetes.

india Updated: Aug 06, 2010 01:20 IST
Susamma Kurian

A 55-year-old woman, who was suffering from malaria, died of cardio-respiratory failure on Thursday morning. Nalini Pardesi, a resident of Kharkhar Lane, had a history of heart disease, low blood pressure and diabetes.

Pardesi is the first malaria patient who died this monsoon in Thane.

Pardesi had been initially admitted to Sahil Hospital in Khopat some three days back. She was shifted to Jupiter Hospital on Wednesday morning after her condition deteriorated.

Though Pardesi had tested positive for malaria, doctors were not sure whether her death was caused by the disease because she was suffering from various multiple medical complications.

“When she was brought to the hospital, she was already on ventilator and was suffering from ischaemic heart disease, low blood pressure and multiple organ failure. The transfer sheet also mentioned that she had malaria. We also conducted the test at our hospital and even here she tested positive for malaria,” said intensivist Dr. Ravindra Ghawat.

When asked whether the heart attack could be linked to malaria, Dr Ghawat said it was difficult to comment on the link.

Around 322 malaria cases were detected in Thane city and some neighbouring areas in July. Around 1,000 cases had been reported from January to June.

Civic officials blamed the hectic construction activity in Thane for the rise in malaria cases. “There are multiple sites under construction and it is the responsibility of the builder to see to it that the sites do not become breeding grounds for mosquitoes,” said civic health officer Dr R T Kendre.

The corporation is in the process of passing a rule, which will make it mandatory for builders to initiate fumigation at their sites, screen their workers and give them a health cards.

“If the builder cannot conduct the fumigation, the corporation will do it for them but they will have to pay for it,” said Dr Kendre.