Riverine belt of Ganga has become battlefield for ganglords | india | Hindustan Times
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Riverine belt of Ganga has become battlefield for ganglords

The 120-kms riverine belt stretching from Maner to Mokama along the Ganga has become a battlefield for many ganglords, reports Ramashankar.

india Updated: Apr 24, 2007 01:21 IST

The 120-kms riverine belt stretching from Maner to Mokama along the Ganga has become a battlefield for many ganglords. Armed with sophisticated firearms, they are all set to take on any one in a bid to maintain their superiority in their area of influence.

The bone of contention among the ganglords is over 500 acre of land that came into existence due to Ganga changing its course over the years. To make matters worse, no portion of this vast land is properly demarcated in government records.

Several incidents of clash among gangsters have been reported to the police in the recent past. A farmer Chandeshwar Rai was abducted when he had gone to supervise farming on diara land on April 3. The victim's kin had lodged a complaint with the Buddha Colony police station. However, Rai's body was recovered from the bank of the river near Mahatma Gandhi Setu on April 15.

Prior to Rai's kidnapping and subsequent murder, two groups of people opened fire at 31-Jaljeera village under Maner police station. Similar incidents were reported from other diara areas. Interestingly, the Maner officer in-charge faced a dilemma following receipt of two letters, one from the DIG and another from the Senior SP.

While the DIG reportedly asked him to stop harvesting of the crop, the Senior SP is learnt to have directed him to get the crop harvested.

Sources said a police team led by assistant sub-inspector Shambhu Prasad obeyed the directive of the SSP and got the crop on 35 bighas of land harvested.

Manohar Rai is said to be the uncrowned king of Makera diara (Mokama), while the writ of CP Singh, Rudal Singh (Dighwara) and Sukhnandan Rai runs in Akilpur diara (Danapur), Guddu Mian and Taufir in Maner and Ranjeet Singh in Digha have their say.

The reason behind the war of supremacy is the handsome cash that the crops, occasionally opium, yield. The cash comes handy for the ganglords to buy arms and also keep their pack happy.

Superintendent of Police (Rural) Upendra Sinha said the officers in-charge had been asked to keep a close vigil on disputed portion of the land. "We are alert. The police, however, have to play a limited role in land related disputes. When such matters come to the police, the latter contact the SDOs and COs as they have land records," he said.