Road ministry banks on software to check accidents | india | Hindustan Times
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Road ministry banks on software to check accidents

At a time when road accident have increased alarmingly across India — in 2010 one road accident death was reported every four minutes — the government, inspired by a software introduced by the Tamil Nadu road department to improve road safety, is planning to replicate the model across the country. Moushumi Das Gupta reports.

india Updated: May 14, 2012 01:38 IST
Moushumi Das Gupta

At a time when road accident have increased alarmingly across India — in 2010 one road accident death was reported every four minutes — the government, inspired by a software introduced by the Tamil Nadu road department to improve road safety, is planning to replicate the model across the country.


The Road Accident Data Management System (RADMS) was introduced in 2009 under a World Bank supported Tamil Nadu road sector project at a cost of Rs 425 crore. The software installed at 1,400 police stations in the state not only geographically maps all accidents taking place on highways but also identifies the most accident-prone spots and condition of roads at such spots. It displays cash trends and other road related details at the click of a mouse.

Though Tamil Nadu ranks among the top five Indian states with maximum road accidents — 45,539 accidents and 11,333 deaths were reported in 2011 — RADMS has helped identify 3,000 accident-prone spots in the state. Since its implementation, the number of accident fatalities has come down from 13.39 fatalities for every 10,000 vehicles in 2006 to 10.09 in 2010. http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/5/14_05_pg-11a.jpg

Impressed by the outcome, the Union road transport and highways ministry wants to replicate the model in the rest of the country. “We are looking to introduce the model across the country during the 12th plan. We are involving National Informatics Centre in customising the software to meet our needs,” said Nitin R Gokarn, joint secretary looking after transport in the ministry.

At present, transport and traffic department officials do not have access to any scientific database on the most accident-prone spots in their states. This severely limits their ability to address the anomalies.