Saif is my superstar: Siddharth Anand | india | Hindustan Times
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Saif is my superstar: Siddharth Anand

Siddharth Anand tells Diganta Guha that he hopes to reach out to a larger section of the suidience with Ta Ra Rum Pum.

india Updated: Apr 17, 2007 10:44 IST

His first film,

Salaam Namaste

, dealt with a live-in relationship and that “cut 50 per cent of my audience” feels director Siddharth Anand. Still, it was a huge success at the box office. With

Ta Ra Rum Pum

Anand says he is spreading his wings.



“I hope I will be able to reach out to a larger section with my second film,” says the young director who has his favourite Saif Ali Khan (who starred in

Salaam Namaste

too) and Rani Mukerji in the film that hits theatres this month.



A Yash Raj Films production (this is Siddharth’s second with the banner), it has formula one racing in the backdrop. “It’s about the highs and lows that a family goes through and I have shown it through the life of a sportsperson,” says Anand.



Why car racing and not more popular sports like cricket, soccer or boxing? “Car racing has aggression and is something new vis-à-vis India. I decided not to take the common route,” answers the director.



If

Salaam Namaste

was shot in Melbourne

Ta Ra Rum Pum

is set in New York. Melbourne, says the director, was a character in his first film.



“However, in this film the story is so prominent that the location isn’t important. Racing takes place in New York, hence New York,” says Siddharth.



Forget the Khan trio (Shah Rukh, Aamir and Salman), for Siddharth, it’s the other Khan (Saif) who is the superstar. His bias is evident.



“He is my superstar. I wrote the film keeping him in mind. And guess what, even his career has seen so many ups and downs. He has the confidence and suits the character,” adds Siddharth.



Why not Preity again? “It’s my vision and Rani fell into place. Even Preity could have done it,” says Anand.



The music is doing well and Siddharth says he wanted to bring the feel of the ’60s (the Shankar-Jaikishen feel) back. Incidentally, each of the songs in the film belongs to a different genre, he adds.



Finally, what about the buzz that working under a big banner means getting overshadowed? Siddharth does not agree adding that he is a fiercely independent person.



“It’s a perception people have, but Yash Raj does gives a lot of creative freedom. People who have worked with them know,” he says.


That’s a safe answer…