Sania Mirza’s wedding plans are creating a pointless controversy | india | Hindustan Times
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Sania Mirza’s wedding plans are creating a pointless controversy

A controversy has arisen as to the nationality of Sania Mirza regarding her participation in future international tournaments, after her marriage to a Pakistani cricketer.

india Updated: Apr 04, 2010 21:53 IST

Sania Mirza’s wedding plans are creating a pointless controversy
A controversy has arisen as to the nationality of Sania Mirza regarding her participation in future international tournaments, after her marriage to a Pakistani cricketer. The couple has declared that, after marriage, they will settle in Dubai. But legally, Sania would become a Pakistani national after marriage, and living in Dubai would make her an alien for India. So claims by India and Pakistan regarding which country she will eventually represent are generating a pointless controversy. Let the time come and let her first start playing tennis. It is only then that her status as a participant can be decided.
LD Bhatia, via email

Still a long, long way to go
The reports State to send every child to school now and Draft food bill belies lofty UPA promises (April 2) expose the double standards of the UPA on both the education and food fronts. It seems the government thinks that its duty ends with the mere enactment of a legislation. The result is that implementation continues to be confined to the legal archives, much like the ban on smoking and on plastic bags. The government has passed the education bill but it needs to provide children with two square meals a day, without getting into the politics of it.
Pawan Sharma, Delhi

II
The right to free education must apply to all without any social bias. This basic right envisages facilitating a healthy and literate civilisation that can claim its rightful share in India’s phenomenal economic growth. There is an urgent need to modernise the infrastructure, curricula and day-to-day running of government schools if we plan to improve national literacy. It is only with the aid of quality education that a nation can attain peace, progress and prosperity.
Syed Khaja, Delhi

A pricey roof over their heads
This refers to the report MLAs eye Games flats (April 2). The unreasonable demand of MLAs for allotment of swanky new flats to them at subsidised rates is in stark contrast to the sad fact that a majority of them are nothing but a national liability. Adequate housing arrangements have already been made for these people. Besides, their demand goes counter to the Delhi chief minister’s call to the public to bear the expense of hosting the Commonwealth Games through increased taxes and a sharp hike in prices of essential commodities. Also, what makes these MLAs more eligible for subsidised housing when so many people continue to live without a roof over their heads?
Mohinder Singh, Delhi

The State has failed its poor
Kudos to Samar Halarnkar for focusing on the issue of poverty in India, which finds few media advocates (India’s big chance, Maha Bharat, April 1). It is not for the want of planning but poor implementation of policies that India’s poor are in this inexcusable condition. There is no accountability at any level of the government and vested political interests continue to exploit the deprived. Can the Congress party explain why it has failed to feed poor people even six decades after Independence? We need strict penalties for the corrupt people, without which any success
on this front is impossible.
Deepanjali Bhas, Delhi

Conserve before it all disappears
The report Arsenic blinds Bhojpur’s babies (April 1) is a matter of great concern, as arsenic is a dangerous contaminant that can cause cancer in humans. In fact, arsenic contaminated water is not considered suitable for consumption even by animals. It is time all state governments got together to prevent the over-use of fast-depleting groundwater reserves, which is resulting in a growing shortage of drinking water.
Sukanta Kar, via email