Satya Paul's show jaded | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 20, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Satya Paul's show jaded

Low on glamour and style, Satya Paul fails to sizzle at this year's fashion week, finds Sidhi Chadha.

india Updated: Apr 09, 2006 22:49 IST

Low on drama, high on wear-ability but poor on glamour and style, Satya Paul failed to sizzle at this year’s fashion week.

'A Sweet Life' as the collection was named turned out to be a little sour for the audience.

CLICK HERE TO SEE PICTURES

Silhouettes that included dresses and saris had no touch of uniqueness to them. They looked jaded to say the least.

"Sari is a beautiful attire, but for international buyers, it’s of no use. It fits right for the museum. Also, the designer has tried to show a line inspired by the 1920s, which makes no sense. We just couldn’t relate to it," says Peppe Orru, a journalist from London.

Rate-o-metre

Late: 10 minutes

Wear-ability: 7

Buzz: 5

Curio:3.5

The show started with a series of saris in georgettes, satins, velvets, kanjeevarams and laces.



The patterns used on the saris were a typical ‘Satya Paul’.

Crème, rose pink, plum, purple, lavender, gold, fuchsia, black and grey formed the colour palette.

The only respite was the blouses that had stylish cuts. Cowls neck, frills on the backside, tube bands keyhole backs and innovative fronts.

Next on ramp was the dress. Two toned, printed, knife pleated, pinstripes, embroidered and layered were some patterns and techniques used. Dresses in olives, lavender, beige and white seemed simple, stylish and wearable.

Fabrics used were lycra, satin and lace. Cowl neck, V-neck and boat neck were some interesting necklines seen.

Special invitee, Mandira Bedi, who has walked the ramp for the label many times before preferred to be part of the audience. “I wanted to walk the ramp but they (Puneet- the designer) didn’t let me,” she quips.

So, how did she find the collection? “Satya Paul designs are phenomenal. Very glamorous and feminine,” says Mandira.

Well, is that really the case? We wonder!