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Schools under fire over admission row

The state government has pulled up private schools for not allowing underprivileged students to sit in the regular classes with mainstream students.

india Updated: Nov 25, 2011 00:40 IST
Divya Sethi

The state government has pulled up private schools for not allowing underprivileged students to sit in the regular classes with mainstream students.

Education minister Geeta Bhukkal admitted that things are not the way as it should be. "We are receiving complaints that children, who belong to BPL (below poverty line) family, are not admitted during normal timings. It is not acceptable," said Bhukkal.

Bhukkal, who was here to inaugurate the 40th annual conference of Council of Boards School Education, said that it is against the provisions of Right to Education Act. "New policies and guidelines will be framed soon in this regard. In next three years residents would see the difference," said Bhukkal on Wednesday.

But private schools have their own story to narrate. "We teach 100 such students in the same classrooms and provide them all the facilities which other students use. We would love to teach them at normal time, but these children are not free in the morning. Despite our repeated requests, they do not agree to come to school in the morning. They come at 11 am and study till 4 pm," said Sudha Goel, principal of Scottish High International School.

Dr Indu Khetarpal, principal, Salwan Public School, said, "Though we mention in our advertisements that 25% seats are reserved for students from economically weaker section, when they approach us they do not have documents to substantiate it. Either parents should get it certified from administration or the act should be made more clear and transparent."

Right to Education Act is the right of children to free and compulsory education. The act has come into force from April 1, 2010.