Sexualization of girls harming self-image | india | Hindustan Times
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Sexualization of girls harming self-image

A new study has found that the bombarding of sexualized images of girls and young women in advertising, merchandising, and media is harming their self-image and healthy development.

india Updated:

A new study has found that the bombarding of sexualized images of girls and young women in advertising, merchandising, and media is harming their self-image and healthy development.

As a part of the study, the American Psychological Association (APA) defined sexualization as occurring when a person's value comes only from her/his sexual appeal or behavior, to the exclusion of other characteristics, and when a person is sexually objectified, e.g., made into a thing for another's sexual use.

Eileen L. Zurbriggen, PhD, chair of the APA Task Force said that the results had shown that the portrayal of women and girls as mere sexual beings was having negative effects in a variety of domains, including cognitive functioning, physical and mental health, and healthy sexual development.

"The consequences of the sexualization of girls in media today are very real and are likely to be a negative influence on girls' healthy development. We have ample evidence to conclude that sexualization has negative effects in a variety of domains, including cognitive functioning, physical and mental health, and healthy sexual development," Dr Zurbriggen said.

According to the task force report, parents can play a major role in contributing to the sexualization of their daughters or can play a protective and educative role.

The APA report calls on parents, school officials, and all health professionals to be alert for the potential impact of sexualization on girls and young women.

Schools, the APA says, should teach media literacy skills to all students and should include information on the negative effects of the sexualization of girls in media literacy and sex education programs.

"As a society, we need to replace all of these sexualized images with ones showing girls in positive settings-ones that show the uniqueness and competence of girls. The goal should be to deliver messages to all adolescents-boys and girls-that lead to healthy sexual development," states Dr. Zurbriggen.

Research evidence shows that the sexualization of girls negatively affects girls and young women across a variety of health domains:

Cognitive and Emotional Consequences: Sexualization and objectification undermine a person's confidence in and comfort with her own body, leading to emotional and self-image problems, such as shame and anxiety.

Mental and Physical Health: Sexualization is linked with three of the most common mental health problems diagnosed in girls and women-eating disorders, low self-esteem, and depression or depressed mood.

Sexual Development: Research suggests that the sexualization of girls has negative consequences on girls' ability to develop a healthy sexual self-image.