Sindhi comedian from Dubai to make Mumbai laugh | india | Hindustan Times
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Sindhi comedian from Dubai to make Mumbai laugh

He’s a Sindhi from Dubai. His father and younger brother are bankers. His mother is a housewife. He is a stand-up comic. A Sindhi stand-up comic from Dubai? Tasneem Nashrulla tells us more.

india Updated: Aug 22, 2009 01:35 IST
Tasneem Nashrulla

He’s a Sindhi from Dubai. His father and younger brother are bankers. His mother is a housewife. He is a stand-up comic. A Sindhi stand-up comic from Dubai? “Yes, I’m an outlaw,” admits Nitin Mirani (30), whose stand-up show, Komic Sutra, hits India at the Sophia Bhabha Auditorium on Saturday.

“Either that, or they messed up at the hospital,” he rues. Mirani is the latest entrant in a recent spate of international stand-up comics making Mumbai laugh, including the popular Indo-Canadian Russel Peters and Australian Johnathon Atherton. Add to that homegrown acts like Raju Srivastava and it seems city folks are finally sitting up to stand-up comedy.

Still, Mirani is a bit of an odd man out with his Middle Eastern Sindhi origins. “Hey, Sindhis do have a good sense of humour if not a good sense of dressing,” defends Mirani. “Well, at least my parents have a sense of humour. They better, considering they have me for a son,” he says.

The ease with which he churns out a joke-a-minute is why Mirani is the toast of UAE’s comedy circuit. In a career spanning 10 years, he’s been a model, TV producer and presenter, award show coordinator, emcee, and for the past four years, a stand-up comic. He was a late bloomer, having cracked his first joke in Class 8.

Now, he’s having the last laugh. With his first ever performance outside of UAE in the city, Mirani asserts he will do “anything to make the audience smile…legally.”

His Hinglish act will see him doing Indian accents and mimicry as well as making light of the city’s innumerable idiosyncrasies. “It’s funny how people in Mumbai travel two hours to reach a nightclub and then have a fit if they don’t get their drink in two minutes,” he says.

Despite being armed with a well-rehearsed script, Mirani always improvises along the way. It saved his life once.

“During one show, I was giving my best jokes but no one was laughing. I almost had a stroke,” he recalls. “A girl in the front row even started reading a newspaper. I pointed this out aloud and told her ‘it’s over between us,’ and the audience started laughing.” So does he pray before heading out on stage? “No, I collect my cheque,” he grins.