Sleaze mails into your account | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Nov 21, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Sleaze mails into your account

A hacker breaking into your mail account and selling sex tips to your colleagues, friends, relatives and even your boss.

india Updated: Aug 28, 2006 06:14 IST

A hacker breaking into your mail account and selling sex tips to your colleagues, friends, relatives and even your boss.    

Hackers can ruin your reputation and rob you of your sleep, as a west Delhi woman has found out to her horror.

The woman — a software employee with a Gurgaon-based firm — has now approached police after she realised that her Yahoo account had been hacked into and an unidentified imposter was sending sleaze mails to almost everyone on her mailing list.

On the basis of her complaint, Delhi Police have registered a case under section 67 of the IT Act. Police sources said it was possible that the culprit is known to the woman.

The hacker signed off the mails, portraying her as a “sex guru” and offered tips about sex and suggested “innovative ways to improve performance”. The recipients included her relatives. To make matters worse, one of her photographs, superimposed with a nude figure, was also circulated.

The bizarre incident came to light when the woman came to know that over 10 people in her office had received the mails. This was just the beginning of her nightmare. She soon realised that similar mails had been sent to her family members, including her husband and friends. The mails sent from her account had detailed information about the woman, including her landline and mobile phone numbers, urging people to get in touch with her.

“Investigations have shown that the mails had been sent from a cyber café in east Delhi. We have identified the cyber café and the computer used to send the mails,” a senior police officer said.

The mail, sources said, was a long and detailed one, running into three pages.

The woman is reportedly in a state of shock and has developed “internet-phobia”.

“The photograph of hers at a family function had been superimposed. Only someone close can have access to it or has passed it on. Also, the mail has been sent to people whom she interacted on a daily basis and the accused knew who these people are,” the officer said.

It is mandatory for all internet parlours to keep records of surfers. However, most cyber cafes do not maintain records of customers, which often makes it difficult for the police to track hackers, especially when they operate from public cafes.