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Small may be the thing to go with

With reference to Satya Prakash’s article The right to sell (Focus, December 18), all those who support foreign direct investment in retail should visit our local markets and eat at roadside eateries.

india Updated: Dec 25, 2011 00:25 IST

Small may be the thing to go with

With reference to Satya Prakash’s article The right to sell (Focus, December 18), all those who support foreign direct investment in retail should visit our local markets and eat at roadside eateries. If they do that, they will realise that the majority of the people cannot afford to buy their daily needs from malls but are dependent on small vendors because many of them provide credit to their poor customers.

Man Mohan Bhatia, Delhi

India shining only for a few

Mahua Venkatesh’s article The great Indian divide (The Big Story, December 18) shows the real picture of this country. India can be one of the world’s fast-growing economies, but only a few are enjoying the benefits of this growth.

Kiran Paul, Ludhiana


Fighting the good fight

This refers to the article Picking up the Bill (Chanakya, December 18). As the Lokpal Bill enters the final lap, all political parties, especially the BJP, are trying to corner the credit. But people are only interested in a strong anti-corruption Bill and not in the political parties and their rivalries. Even though the Bill has been tabled in Parliament, I feel it is too early to celebrate because it is being passed by corrupt politicians who will leave loopholes in it. The nation shouldn’t settle for anything less than a foolproof Lokpal Bill. But as things stand now, I don’t think we will get one.

Prashant Rakheja, Gurgaon

After trying (unsuccessfully) to malign Anna Hazare and dilute the Bill by keeping the prime minister out of its ambit, the Congress is now trying to take credit, as Chanakya rightly points out, for tabling the Bill in Parliament. The Bill is an idea whose time has come and there’s nothing that the government can do to stall it further.

A Rai, via email

Chanakya states that “the only thing shorter than public memory is public enthusiasm”. But that’s incorrect. In the last year or so, every time Anna Hazare has protested against the government, people have come out in large numbers in his support. And they will continue to show solidarity with Hazare because he is fighting for a right cause.
Rakesh Tripathi, Mumbai

Better times could be ahead

With reference to Karan Thapar’s article Annus horribilis (Sunday Sentiments, December 18), the author advocates consensus between the government and Team Anna on the issue of the Lokpal Bill but his prejudice against the latter is quite evident. If reaching a consensus was so easy, then Parliament would have passed the Bill in the monsoon session. The tussle over the Bill is not coming to an end because the government is not willing to bend. Why then should Hazare and his supporters end their protests?

Kumar Anand, Delhi

It’s true that 2011 was riddled with protests and a crisis of leadership. But I don’t share Thapar’s pessimism. With time, everyone will forget about the ongoing turmoil. Once the debate over the Lokpal Bill is over, the nation will come together to fight against other problems. Therefore, we shouldn’t let negative thoughts get the better of us.

RD Singh, Ambala

Getting to know a stalwart

Ian McEwan’s article A flame burns to the end (360 degree, December 18) was an interesting read. It was not only loaded with information on the life and times of journalist-author Christopher Hitchens, but well written too. In India, not many people know about Hitchens or his work. Thanks to the extensive media coverage of his death and writers like McEwan, we learnt about the brilliance of the man.

Anil Bagarka, via email