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Son rise in afternoon

india Updated: Aug 30, 2008 21:16 IST
Minakshi Saini
Minakshi Saini
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

It has taken a while — rather a long while — but Shammi Kapoor’s son is finally ready for his first role. At the age of 52. And he couldn’t care less about how many years have gone past. All he wants now is to look towards the future.

“My time has come now and I am loving it,” says Aditya Raj Kapoor, who makes his acting debut in Boney Kapoor’s Diwangi Ne Had Kar Di.

Aditya strongly believes that nothing is ever ‘too late’ as things happen in their own time. Besides, his priorities were different from that of other star sons. “I opted to be a family man for more than two decades, fulfilling responsibilities,” he says. “Then, I looked ahead and grabbed the opportunity that came my way.”

While he describes himself as the first person in the Kapoor family to debut with a negative role, Aditya adds that his character is much more than a plain bad guy. “It has various shades, and it’s a tribute to the noted yesteryear villain KN Singh.”

As for future acting ventures, he has decided on a few scripts and announcements will be made in some time. “In the coming year, you’ll get to see a lot of me on the big screen,” he promises, in the same breath dismissing any possibility of rivalry with the other Kapoors. “The Indian film industry is an ocean that has space for everyone’s talent,” he believes. “Rather, I’d say we all complement each other. I am looking forward to working with everybody — from Rishi to Ranbir.”

Aditya never had any acting training; he proudly declares that it’s in his genes. This debut is not his first active participation in a film, though.

Primarily a management expert, he also dabbled in direction, assisting in a couple of Hindi films. At one point, within the past two years or so, he also got opportunities to direct films in association with producers abroad, whom he met in the course of his work. He has directed three English films — Don’t Stop Dreaming, Sambar Salsa and Shamal. The first was released in some UK and West Asian territories and the last two will release this year.

His fourth directorial venture, which he plans to release in India, is titled Baltidevi, Queen Of South Hall - A Musical, the gritty story of a girl married in India and taken to Southall, London’s Asian pocket. The actress to play the lead is none other than drama queen Rakhi Sawant.

Aditya says, “I saw her on a talk show. The appeal in her eyes and the emotion in her heart were waiting to come out.” Apparently, Rakhi cried when she read the script. And, of course, took the role.

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