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It’s the season for apologies. In fact, every apology demanded, and every apology made or suggested, has had its own delightful twist that is a veritable lesson on the art of politics.

india Updated: May 28, 2007 05:04 IST

It’s the season for apologies. In fact, every apology demanded, and every apology made or suggested, has had its own delightful twist that is a veritable lesson on the art of politics. For Channel Four, which has been asked to tender an apology for its handling of the race row over Shilpa Shetty on the celebrity show Big Brother, an apology might just take the form of the resignation of its chief executive Andy Duncan. Even as Channel Four recruits its apology drafter, Dera Sacha Sauda followers in Punjab are cut up that their leader’s apology of an apology hasn’t been enough to calm inflamed passions.

A few weeks ago, it was Richard Gere who “offered to make a sincere apology” after his Shall-We-Dance act with the same Ms Shetty whipped up the moral police’s adrenaline levels to dizzying heights. Interestingly, Ms Shetty was more than forgiving. As she was previously with Jane Goody, who dared sneer at her Indianness. Clearly, Ms Shetty does not feel very sorry for herself. And who can forget Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit who “didn’t want to hurt anyone” when she said that migrant Biharis are cramping Delhi’s infrastructure. For those following the fine-print, no-one’s really apologised as such. But what the heck? We’ve come a long way from the time when only food giants and cola companies had to eat their junk food and their words. In recent memory, McDonald’s stands tall as one of the first to issue an apology for using beef tallow for their French Fries. Big mistake that led to the Big McLibel.

But is the world making each other apologise a bit too much? After all, what’s in an apology? A sorry state of affairs, we think.