Spare the Mobile, Save the Child | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jan 20, 2017-Friday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Spare the Mobile, Save the Child

india Updated: Jan 12, 2009 00:06 IST
Bharati Chaturvedi
Bharati Chaturvedi
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

If you have a child under 18, then you’ve been through the mobile phone dilemma: to give or not to give. Most of Delhi’s best schools have managed to successfully restrict mobile phones. And most parents agree with the school policy.

By applying these strict rules, some schools and parents are actually reaping double benefits — they are likely protecting their children’s health. There are fears about the impact of mobile phones on the health of children — cancer, including that of the brain, and behavioural issues.

Based on this, France has banned advertising of mobile phones to children, because of the fear of brain cancer in later years. They fear that children under 12 are still growing, and can be seriously harmed if they use cell phones. And the Independent newspaper reports that France is not alone. Russia and Canada have also been concerned about the possibility of radiation caused illness from these devises. Even Israel, currently knowingly causing grave harm to hundreds of children in Gaza, has concerns about the impact of such radiation on its own children.

What makes this remarkable is that governments admits there is no long term study available on the impact of mobile phone usage on children, but insist on these steps based on the precautionary principle and the fact that many children are using mobile phones today. Their health has to be protected, even if data is scarce.

Drowning under coal

Over half of the US live within 30 miles of a coal plant. This means they have dirty air, along with adequate electricity. And now, they are paying a heavy price for such intense energy consumption. Recently, over a billion gallons of coal sludge engulfed an Eastern Tennessee community, impacting tens of thousands of people.

<