Stalemate over Cong-DMK tie-up | india | Hindustan Times
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Stalemate over Cong-DMK tie-up

Despite several rounds of talks, the two parties failed to reach an agreement on seat sharing in Pondicherry.

india Updated: Apr 04, 2006 15:16 IST

Uncertainty continues on the Congress-DMK alliance in the ensuing assembly elections for the Union Territory.

Despite several rounds of talks, the two parties failed to reach an agreement on the seat sharing and the AICC president Sonia Gandhi is expected to hold talks with the Communication and Information Technology Minister Dayanidhi Maran in New Delhi to sort out the issue on Monday.

The Congress party which contested alone in the 2001 elections and won 11 seats and later swelled its tally to 16 with the merger of Puducherry Munnetra Congress (PMC), do not want to give away the advantage of forming a Government of its own.

The Congress party is reportedly insisting for more than 16 seats so that it could form the Government.

However, the DMK which is having seven members in the present house is reportedly demanding 12 seats, because of which the stalemate still prevails. The PMK and CPI were also claiming seats.

With just two days left for the notification of first phase of elections for two constituencies in Mahe and one in Yanam region which goes to poll on May three, the AIADMK-PMC combine along with MDMK and DPI had finalised its alliance and seat sharing before started electioneering. AIADMK supremo J Jayalalitha had campaigned for the alliance candidates the other day.

Even in case of a Congress-DMK alliance, the parties will find the seat accomodation a big task. As of now, Congress party ticket aspirants had nurtured some DMK constituencies and vice-versa.

There is every possibility of a few aspirants, who could not obtain ticket in the Congress as well as in DMK, quitting the parties, and with this in view, PMC had not announced candidates for Bussy and Kuruvinatham constiteuncies, so that the dissidents could be roped in as their candidates.