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Students look at switching subjects after admission

The course versus college debate has taken a new turn. Many students have taken admission in any course they could get through in a college of their choice. They are now hoping that they'll be able to switch to their preferred subject once admissions are closed. Shaswati Das reports.

india Updated: Jun 23, 2011 23:07 IST
Shaswati Das

The course versus college debate has taken a new turn. Many students have taken admission in any course they could get through in a college of their choice. They are now hoping that they'll be able to switch to their preferred subject once admissions are closed.

The marginal reduction in cut-offs has still not eased the woes of students who were looking at opting for the more coveted commerce and humanities courses.

These students have now decided to opt for a "lesser" course in a college of their choice and later request authorities to accommodate them in the course of their liking.

College authorities have, however, refused to permit any changes in stream selection once admissions have been finalised.

"We will not permit any student to switch to another subject once they have opted for a particular subject. If a student chooses to do history, then a change to economics or psychology will not be entertained as these subjects had higher cut-offs," said Ujjaini Ray, media coordinator, Lady Sri Ram College.

No matter what college authorities say, students are still willing to take a chance. "I did not clear the cut-off for psychology (honours). So I am planning to take admission in BA programme. Once, admissions are over or before the new session commences, I can always change to psychology," said Isha Kathuria, an applicant at Lady Sri Ram College.

The story is similar in other colleges too. "For me, the college brand name holds a lot of value. I'm hoping that the college will offer some flexibility in letting a student switch to another course if he/she is capable of handling the subject. It is not fair that we don't get the course of our choice because of exceptionally high cut-offs," said Nishant Bagga, an applicant at Hindu College.