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Sunday letters

Khushwant Singh, while praising anchor Koel Purie in his article Falling in love with a television show host (With Malice Towards One and All, November 7), seems to suggest that he prefers miniskirts to traditional Indian dresses.

india Updated: Nov 13, 2010 22:48 IST

Singh needs a dressing down for his views on clothing
Khushwant Singh, while praising anchor Koel Purie in his article Falling in love with a television show host (With Malice Towards One and All, November 7), seems to suggest that he prefers miniskirts to traditional Indian dresses. Women in India opt for saris and salwar-kameezes because they are elegant, comfortable and unique to Indian culture. Miniskirts, on the other hand, are rarely worn. Such views are unbecoming of men of Singh’s age and intellect. The author should focus on encouraging the youth to uphold Indian values and tradition instead of feasting his eyes on women wearing minimal clothing.
Sharda Bhargav, via email

II
Though I admire Singh's honest and candid writings on issues that affect India, its future and its people, I failed to understand the need for his recounting his love for Koel Purie, anecdotes from her rich grandfather VV Puri's life and the reasons for her father Aroon Purie's success. Is Singh running out of topics to write on?
Rakesh Sherawat, via email

Real troopers when it comes to corruption
This refers to Enemy of the Force by Samrat and Sanjib Kr Baruah and A matter of honour by Pravin Sawhney (The Big Story, November 7). Before the Adarsh scam came to light, corruption was the prerogative of Indian politicians. But the Adarsh scam shows that the defence forces have jumped on the corruption bandwagon and are ready to give tough competition to our netas. Prompt action by the defence ministry against the tainted personnel will go a long way towards dealing with this ‘imbalance', which is the need of the hour.
Sanjiv Kanjilal, via email

II
Both the articles along with the illustration of a soldier hiding wads of money in his pockets are in bad taste. The Indian army is among the least corrupt institutions in India. It wouldn't be wrong to say that at least 80% of our personnel are honest. It's surprising that the Army hasn't yet raised objections to the misleading depiction of
the soldier.
Abhay Rishi, via email

Sins of a few
Karan Thapar's concern over the involvement of senior officers of the defence forces in the Adarsh Housing Society scam is justified. (A call to arms, Sunday Sentiments, November 7). But it would be unfair to point fingers at the 15-million strong Indian Army for the mistake of only three officials. Cases like the Adarsh scam, though disappointing, shouldn't lower the morale of our troops.
RD Singh, Ambala Cantt

II
Thapar rightly states that corruption in the armed forces has come as a big surprise. It can also be interpreted as an indicator of the problems that our soldiers face and which are seldom addressed, and which force them to resort to unlawful activities. To check this, the government should ensure that our personnel are provided with state-of-the-art equipment and ample supplies. Their salaries should be revised too. The army chief has promised a prompt inquiry into the Adarsh scam and strict action against the guilty. We hope he is a man of his word.
SC Vaid, via email

Many natural allies
In Irritants apart, Indo -US ties will continue (Counterpoint, November 7), though Vir Sanghvi concludes that India and the US are natural allies, he forgets that the same can be said about America and Pakistan too. Everyone knows that the intelligence agencies of both the nations work closely and the US doesn't think twice before giving aid worth billions of dollars to Pakistan. On the other hand, America needs India only to countervail the threat that it faces from China. Presidents may come and go but America's foreign policy will always be guided by self-interest. India should make the Obama administration realise that it can't take New Delhi for granted.
SK Wasan, Delhi

Cutting corners
India is brimming with scams and Manas Chakravarty satirically highlights this in Scam geography (Loose Canon, November 7). If this unhealthy trend continues, we will soon have to rename Hindustan as 'Scamstan'.
G.K. Arora, Delhi