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Sunday letters

It is really sad that some people in the US, the world's oldest democracy, are tweeting racist comments about Nina Davuluri, the first Indian-American to be crowned Miss America.

india Updated: Sep 29, 2013 00:08 IST

The darker side of beauty standards
With reference to Yashwant Raj's article Haters are gonna hate (September 22), it is really sad that some people in the US, the world's oldest democracy, are tweeting racist comments about Nina Davuluri, the first Indian-American to be crowned Miss America.

However, it was really graceful of Davuluri that she did not react to such comments. Instead, she termed her victory an opportunity to tackle cultural stereotypes. Her victory should force India to revisit its obsession with lighter skin tones.

Beauty pageants in India hardly reflect diversity. Our matrimonial advertisements show our prejudice regarding a person's colour. It is time to rise above caste, creed, colour and religion.

Kamala Kumari, via email

A tale of Modi's inclusive growth
With reference to the article Challenges before Modi (Chanakya, September 22), Chanakya has rightly stated that Narendra Modi's "best practices" in Gujarat are "laudable", but to succeed at the Centre, his approach must be inclusive, away from religious considerations. His recent speeches suggest that he is cognisant of this crucial requirement.

M Ratan , Delhi

II
Modi has proved his political mettle by winning the state elections for three consecutive terms. Now, at the national level, he's making all the right noises by banking on the development plank to counter a corruption-ridden Congress government.

Ramesh Agarwal, Kanpur

Tunnel vision on secularism
With reference to Karan Thapar's article Lessons the army can teach Mr Modi (Sunday Sentiments, September 22), by not fielding a Muslim candidate in the assembly elections, Modi does not become a non-secular person.

It is sad that a lot of people, including Thapar, view everything in politics through the prism of religion. In an election, winnability decides who gets the party ticket. This in turn, depends on an individual politician's popularity and potential to win an election from a particular seat.

Anshul Mittal, via email

II
It is undeniable that the Indian Army is a great example of secularism where soldiers of different faiths take part in all religious festivals.

However, it would be imprudent to drag into this observation, Modi's 'aversion' to wearing a skull cap. Soldiers celebrate festivals in their Army uniforms without letting anything interfere with their own religious practices. Wearing a skull cap or head gear is a creation of secular politics.

SK Mehta, via email