Sunil Gavaskar didn’t choose club over country, so... | india | Hindustan Times
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Sunil Gavaskar didn’t choose club over country, so...

Ashok Malik’s article No breaking news (June 1) incorrectly states that in 1980 Sunil Gavaskar refused to play in the West Indies tour after playing 13 Test matches in the season and instead chose to play English county cricket.

india Updated: Jun 06, 2011 23:03 IST

Sunil Gavaskar didn’t choose club over country, so...

Ashok Malik’s article No breaking news (June 1) incorrectly states that in 1980 Sunil Gavaskar refused to play in the West Indies tour after playing 13 Test matches in the season and instead chose to play English county cricket. As a friend of Gavaskar, I want to highlight that at the time he had played around 17, not 13, Test matches. Gavaskar had requested the then BCCI president to write to the West Indies cricket board and request them to drop one of the three warm-up games before the first Test so that the Indian team could rest. His request was rejected and Gavaskar conveyed to the board that he won’t be available for the tour and was prepared to give up captaincy. The West Indies tour took place between mid-February and end-April while the English county season began in May. So he did not turn his back on the nation to play county cricket.

Raju Mehta, via email

Taking a wrong position on yoga

Amrit Dhillon in The new Babalog (June 4) points out the ‘shortcomings’ of yoga. But is he qualified to question the ancient practice? The writer must know that even Prime Minister Manmohan Singh holds Sri Sri Ravi Shankar in high esteem. Millions of Sri Sri’s followers address him as ‘His Holiness’ out of love, and not because he desires to be called that.

Rohit Srivastava, Delhi

Who’s the real culprit?

With reference to Amitabh Mattoo’s article Wait and watch, and suffer (June 3), everyone in Pakistan, from ministers to journalists to the common man, is a victim of terrorism. As the line dividing the State actors and the non-State actors blurs, it is getting difficult to nail down the real culprits.

Pratham Dwivedi, Delhi