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Taslima controversy

Apropos of the report Bengal unmoved, Taslima stuck (November 26), it is the irony of our political system that everything is decided keeping in mind vote-banks.

india Updated: Nov 28, 2007 21:55 IST

Apropos of the report Bengal unmoved, Taslima stuck (November 26), it is the irony of our political system that everything is decided keeping in mind vote-banks. Instead of honouring the honesty of Taslima, we are defaming her when she has acknowledged that Kolkata is her second home. If Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee can retain the CPI(M) cadres despite the killing of so many innocent people in Nandigram, why can’t Taslima who has given a voice to deprived women all over the world be allowed to stay?

Aman Prakash, Delhi

II

Taslima Nasreen’s penchant for controversial writing should not be viewed in isolation. The best way for flop authors to become popular is to insult religion. Taslima has done what Salman Rushdie did after years of failed writings. If Indians have accepted a foreigner like Taslima’s stay in our country, then why is an Indian artist, M.F. Hussain, being kept out of his country.

Salman Qureshi, via e-mail

A national disgrace

The sordid events in Guwahati following the adivasi demonstration shows the magnitude of decadence in our civil society. How can this cancer of intolerance in human behaviour be checked? Social scientists should ponder these questions to put us on a track of sanity and politicians must keep away.

OP Tandon, via e-mail

II

The attack on a tribal woman in Guwahati is abhorrent. Isn’t being a woman enough reason not to tear off her clothes? Such crimes should shake the nation’s conscience. The perpetrators must be brought to book.

Neha Rathi, Delhi

A hairy scare

The report Holy smoke! Cigarettes can make men go bald (Nov. 27) says cigarettes stuffed with hairy tobacco could turn men bald. But observation proves otherwise. Bald men like Gandhiji did not touch tobacco, while Jinnah enjoyed tobacco and sported a head full of hair.

KK Mohanty, via e-mail