Tata has shown that Small is Beautiful | india | Hindustan Times
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Tata has shown that Small is Beautiful

india Updated: Jan 19, 2008 23:13 IST

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Vir Sanghvi's article Ratan Tata: Then and Now (Counterpoint, January 13) is an apt tribute to a legendary man who is the heir of JRD Tata in the true sense. I remember Ratan Tata making a promise of producing a Rs one lakh car for the middle-class two years before his retirement. He has given a new meaning to the hopes and aspirations of Indians. Many of them would not dream of owning a car otherwise. All the concerns about traffic jams are valid. It is the duty of the government to provide traffic-friendly roads. Lessen red tape in bureaucracy, throw out corrupt officials and contractors to speed up infrastructure projects. Tata has given an inspirational example to a young India and to the world.

Sudhkar Anchan, Mumbai

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Vir Sanghvi has rightly applauded the vision and services of Ratan Tata towards the progress of India, particularly the common man. Those who are opposing Nano on grounds like pollution and traffic congestion are either jealous of Tata’s achievement or feeling insecure. If a rich man can have half a dozen big cars, why can’t a lower middle-class family have at least one Nano? It seems the Indian elite has inherited the legacy of the British norm of divide and rule.

RD Singh, Jammu

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Ratan Tata is a living legend who has the ability to turn the tide in his favour in the toughest of times. With the successful launch of the Nano, he has added another feather to his already crowded cap. Hats off to Tata for showing the world that nothing is impossible. With able leadership and remarkable values, the Tatas have arrived on the world stage with a bang.

Mohit Salhotra, Mumbai

Not Such a Miracle

This refers to Manas Chakravarty’s Open letters to Mr Tata (January13). While everyone is singing paeans of praise for the small wonder Nano, the flip side amply describes the pitfalls that may occur once the car takes to the road. These letters written to Tata with a three-year gap in between them appear to be a figment of the imagination. However, read between the lines, the forecast of events detailed in the letter cannot be taken lightly. Forewarned is forearmed. The ruling party may well take these letters seriously and take the necessary steps to circumvent the problems that could be created by the small-budget miracle car.

K Venkataraman, Delhi

The Taslima Dilemma

Karan Thapar's article Hark! Is the bell tolling? (January 13) touches on the heritage of the traditions of free and fearless debate in Indian civilisation, its unique raison d’etre and its abasement at the hands of two eminent Cabinet ministers in the handling of Taslima Nasreen’s situation. Hospitality to a guest is part of Indian tradition. But all the traditions are being thrown out for Taslima Nasreen, first by the I&B Minister who, as Karan Thapar notes, is ironically the custodian of the freedom of press and broadcast, and then by the Minister for External Affairs.

Piret Pande, via e-mail