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Technology makes learning science more interactive

If technology has its final say, science lessons will never be the same humdrum boring affair one usually associates them with, for they will come in the form of interactive computer games.

india Updated: Jun 12, 2006 14:21 IST
ANI

If technology has its final say, science lessons will never be the same humdrum boring affair one usually associates them with, for they will come in the form of interactive computer games.

Educationists are increasingly taking help from computer experts to develop science games in their effort to impart scientific education to pupils. Some teachers have already substituted their old books with these games.

Paul Bierman, at the University of Vermont in Burlington said, “The last time I used textbooks was five years ago.” Instead of traditional books, Professor Bierman relies on computer simulations, demonstrations and other interactive projects for his teaching.

One of his project includes looking at archived online photos of historic Vermont landscapes over the past 200 years for observing and studying the process of landscape change. Recently, Professor Bierman organised a workshop in Washington, DC, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, on the future of the printed science textbook.

Experts believe the reason why teachers like Bierman are ditching books and taking to this techonological innovation is because books take long to be printed. In some cases books become outdated even before reaching the classroom.

The same isn’t true for learning with the aid of technology. This apart, studies have also shown that not every student learns effectively by passive activities like reading, reports Nature.

“We found that teachers were surfing the Web to find the best lessons for their class,” said Angelica Stacy, a chemistry professor at the University of California at Berkeley.

Experts from Google and Microsoft Corporation are now of the opinion that virtually all books could end up on the Internet, where people could read the specially displayed downloads on a variety of electronic devices, including cell phones and laptops.