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Telepathy connects couple!

A gold miner trapped underground for two weeks sent telepathic messages to wife to let her know he was still alive.

india Updated: May 15, 2006 13:35 IST
AFP

One of the Australian gold miners trapped underground for two weeks sent telepathic messages to his wife to let her know he was still alive, a report said on Monday.

Brant Webb's communication with wife Rachel was so strong that she even went and emptied his locker at the mine before he asked her to, according to the report in the New Idea magazine.

The magazine cites a diary her father Michael Kelly wrote as he comforted his daughter following the Beaconsfield mine accident which buried Webb and a colleague alive, and killed a third man.

Kelly wrote that his daughter had never doubted her husband had survived, and that she told him that Brant had spoken to her while she was driving the day after the accident, causing her to drive off the road.

"I though she might have been battling the drive. Instead she looked up with the loveliest smile. 'Brant has just spoken to me. He is alive and OK,'" Kelly wrote on April 26.

After the men were discovered alive, it appeared that Rachel had been following her husband's wishes even though the childhood sweethearts had not been able to speak to each other, he wrote.

"Brant sent Rachel a note telling her to take his car and empty his locker. He wants his belongings as far away from here as she can get them," Kelly wrote.

"She's already done it, of course. She said he'd told her to. And I can't believe it - he's got pains in his legs, just like she said."

After Webb and his colleague were found alive on April 30, it took nine days to extricate them from their small steel cage almost a kilometre (half a mile) underground.

The men have not spoken publicly about their ordeal but have hired a manager to sell their story, which is expected to attract multi-million dollar bids for television, print and movie rights.