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The ban on smoking needs to be enforced more effectively

The report Bus conductors can now fine you for smoking (October 2) brought glad tidings for those of us fed up of smoking passively in public spaces.

india Updated: Oct 04, 2009 21:38 IST

The ban on smoking needs to be enforced more effectively

The report Bus conductors can now fine you for smoking (October 2) brought glad tidings for those of us fed up of smoking passively in public spaces. Despite the year-old ban on smoking in public places, many people continue to break the law with impunity, without fear of consequences. So the decision to empower people like bus conductors to fine offenders is a welcome step and should be followed up diligently. But if conductors themselves are smoking in public buses, who will punish them?

NR Ramachandran, via email

Speaking for the Chinese

The Indian media’s excessive coverage of the Chinese national day celebrations suggests that a section of it is representing either the Chinese strategic community or is being driven by vested interests hell-bent on forcing an arms-buying spree (China turns 60 in style, October 2). Non-disclosure of your firepower neither amounts to comparative weakness, nor does the display of military inventory convey an edge. This is not to say that we should rest at ease when our neighbours arm themselves to the teeth. But the deliberate attempt to create a semblance of inferiority should be avoided. Our media must do the needful for restoring sanity in the greater national interest.

Ananth Seth, Delhi

A touch of professionalism

With reference to the editorial Nuclear power still locked in (Our Take, October 2), private sector involvement in nuclear energy is a fabulous idea. It can help alleviate various problems if applied in earnest. The private sector is seen as far more developed and professional than the public sector, yielding better results not only in terms of quality but also in other aspects such as customer care and delivery timelines.

Anmol Arora, via email

Paying back in the same coin

The report China stamps Kashmir dispute on its visa sheet (October 2), only proves our neighbour’s double standards. After its illegal incursions into India, China is now openly breaching diplomatic protocol with Pakistan’s support. People in Arunachal Pradesh have also been issued similar loose-sheet visas earlier. China is treating both Arunachal and J&K as disputed territories. Mere protesting is not enough; the government should retaliate by adopting the stapled visa technique for Tibet and Xinjiang nationals.

Achyut Railkar, Mumbai

The politicians’ new playground

Ashok Malik in The game changers (October 1) has unveiled the changing mathematics of Indian politics. What was once the hunting ground for regional parties, now is a coveted playground for national parties, with the BJP and Congress squeezing themselves into the narrow regional political frame — sidelining local players like the RJD in Bihar and the SP in Uttar Pradesh. They’re all wooing upper-caste voters, in defiance of conventional political strategy.

Sunny Mitra, Kolkata

Let’s not drink to that

The report Licensed to serve: Malls will sell liquor (October 1) shows that the day is not far when even malls will be full of drunkards. The Delhi government’s unwise decision will only encourage public inebriation. Sure enough, Delhiites will soon be able to shop for everything from vegetables to liquor in the same place. But do we really want ugly replicas of street liquor shops in our shopping malls?

Jaspreet Kaur, Delhi

Not a well-informed view

Preeti Singh’s article North bothered! (September 30), while being a sincere effort by the writer to play down the differences between various groups of people in India, was highly objectionable. In fact, it was proof of Delhiites’ ignorance and apathy.

Aparna Ramachandran, Delhi