The Brothers Ambani have patched up. Or have they? | india | Hindustan Times
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The Brothers Ambani have patched up. Or have they?

The truce between Mukesh and Anil Ambani is good news for the companies they own and their shareholders (Ambanis make up, agree on friendly fight, May 24).

india Updated: May 26, 2010 21:56 IST

The Brothers Ambani have patched up. Or have they?
The truce between Mukesh and Anil Ambani is good news for the companies they own and their shareholders (Ambanis make up, agree on friendly fight, May 24). But a mere handshake in front of the media doesn’t mean that all’s well between the two brothers. However, they must realise that cooperation, and not competition, will help them consolidate their business interests more in the long run.
M.M. Goel, Kurukshetra

Non-performers must go
In his article The writing’s on the wall, bow out gracefully (Big Picture, May 22), Pradeep Magazine makes a valid point that it’s high time that senior sports officials make way for younger people. No matter what they feel, the preparations for the Commonwealth Games will not suffer if they quit.
Atimanav Solanki , via email

II
I agree with Magazine’s views. Take the case of the Indian Olympic Association (IOA). On the one hand, it doesn’t want the government to question its working style for it is answerable only to the International Olympic Committee. But on the other, it depends on the Centre for funds. Such double standards prove that senior officials in sports bodies are doing more harm than good to Indian sports.
R. Arora Delhi

Singh has led from the front
With reference to the editorial A Narrative of continuation (Our Take, May 22), Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s deft handling of crises over the past six years has helped the nation move forward. Contrary to what political pundits believe, Singh’s focus on improving ties with Pakistan and stabilising the economy haven’t come in his way of dealing with other problems.
Ashok Goswami, Mumbai

Don’t politicise the Naxal issue
Home Minister P. Chidambaram has repeatedly blamed the states for failing to tackle the Maoist problem. But the Union government is equally responsible for whatever is happening in Chhattisgarh. The Chhattisgarh government is ill-equipped to match the might of the insurgents and needs assistance from the Centre urgently. The Congress should not politicise the Naxal issue. Instead, it must take urgent action against the rebels.
Danendra Jain, Agartala

Governance going for a toss
This refers to the report All options open, says Soren (May 23). In the past, the BJP had made a mistake of aligning with Shibu Soren, one of the most corrupt politicians in India. Now, even after a fortnight of flip-flop, there’s no consensus over which party will support Soren in forming the Jharkhand government. Unfortunately, no politician or political party realises that their squabble for power is hampering the state’s governance.
Ramesh Sinha, Delhi

No surprises here
The decision of Pakistan Supreme Court to uphold the release of Lashkar-e-Tayyeba founder Hafiz Saeed from house arrest shouldn’t surprise India. Pakistan doesn’t want to cooperate with India in the investigations into the 26/11 attacks that were allegedly planned by Saeed. The decision should silence all those who did not believe that there’s a nexus between the Pakistan government and the terror groups.
Mahesh Kumar, via email

Swaraj is on the right path
Pankaj Vohra in Brand Vajpayee’s new face is Sushma (Between Us, May 24) rightly states that Sushma Swaraj is “driven by a conscious desire to enhance the status that she already has”. Her recent visit to Veer Bhoomi on the death anniversary of former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi confirms that she believes in inclusive politics. Her political ideology will hopefully help the BJP to win the next election.
Yogesh Pandey, via email